Almost 50 schoolkids aged four to seven are excluded each day for attacking their teachers

ALMOST 50 schoolchildren aged four to seven are sent home for attacking teachers every day, shock figures unearthed by The Sun on Sunday reveal.

The number of assaults by the Key Stage 1 kids in Britain’s classrooms – almost 9,000 in a year – has leapt by a fifth in just 12 months.

Getty – Contributor

Almost 50 schoolchildren aged four to seven are sent home for attacking teachers every day[/caption]

The conduct of these youngsters – aged four to seven and in the first three years of primary school -has got worse over recent years with a record number being suspended.
Data released under Freedom of Information laws show that 8,845 KS1 children were banished home for launching a physical attack on an adult at school in a year.

With about 190 school days in the year it means that on average there are 46-47 incidents every day when four to seven years olds are sent home for attacking teachers or their adult helpers.

And the shocking total – for September 2016 to September 2017, the latest figures available – is DOUBLE the number just four years earlier.

In 2105-2016 there were 7,300 suspensions for this reason. There were 5,930 in 2014-2015 and the year before there were 5,360
Getty – Contributor

In 2105-2016 there were 7,300 suspensions for this reason. There were 5,930 in 2014-2015 and the year before there were 5,360[/caption]

In 2105-2016 there were 7,300 suspensions for this reason. There were 5,930 in 2014-2015 and the year before there were 5,360.

The attacks on adults lead to a fixed-term exclusion – meaning pupils are banned from school for a set number of days before being allowed back.

There were also 130 cases last year where KS1 pupils were expelled from school permanently for a physical assault on one of their teachers.

This means that education chiefs then have to find another primary school for the child to join.

The physical assault on an adult by a pupil can be anything from obstruction and jostling right up to serious cases of wounding.

KIDS OUT OF CONTROL

The number of times that pupils from KS1 pupils were sent home for attacking a teacher in each of the last ten school years is:

2016/17: 8,845

2015/16: 7,300

2014/15: 5,930

2013/14: 5,360

2012/13: 4,210

2011/12: 3,820

2010/11: 3,430

2009/10: 3,140

2008/09: 2,880

2007/08: 2,850

Ten years ago children in the youngest year groups accounted for just two percent of all occasions where children were suspended from school.

But now they account for almost five percent.

Pupils can be suspended for a whole range of misdemeanours including verbal and physical abuse of fellow pupils and adults, bullying, racist and sexist abuse, stealing, drugs offences and persistent disruptive behaviour.

Christopher McGovern, Chairman of the Campaign for Real Education, said: “Rising numbers of out-of-control infants should concern us all, massively!

“Some parents are, clearly, failing their children and this is storing up big trouble for all of society in the future.

“A way forward might be to require parents of excluded infants to attend parenting classes. Faced with intolerable classroom disorder it is small wonder that so many new teachers – 40% – leave the profession within five years.

“With applications for teacher training in decline , heaven only knows how we shall ever recruit the 47, 000 extra teachers required by 2026 to meet the growing population of pupils.”

A Department for Education spokesman said: ““Classrooms should be safe, calm and stimulating places where children can be taught and teachers can teach. Poor behaviour disrupts children’s education, often most keenly affecting disadvantaged young people.

“Permanently excluding a child from school should only ever be a last resort, and we support teachers in making these difficult decisions where they are justified.

“We have launched an external review to look at how exclusions are used and why certain groups are disproportionately affected.”



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