Amazing chart French worker uses to understand Brit colleagues’ English words like ‘trolleyed’ and ‘minging’

AS a nation we have a lot of slang words people from other countries wouldn’t understand.

But a French worker has come up with a handy solution to the problem – a table of commonly used slang words and their meanings.

The French worker's list was uploaded to Reddit and the responses were priceless
The French worker’s list was uploaded to Reddit and the responses were priceless
althorno/Reddit

When their colleague shared a photo of the table to Reddit, hilarious comments began flooding in.

Discussions about whether the slang was accurate, when it came about and from what regions ensued.

And there were plenty of linguistic puns in between.

The debate kicked off by questioning if anyone in the UK besides Jamie Oliver actually uses the word ‘pukka’.

When one Reddit user questions the use of the word, Daedeluss is quick to mention it’s a term readily used in Jamie Oliver’s cookery shows.

The thread quickly turned into an attack on the chef
The thread quickly turned into an attack on the chef

The conversation then descends into calling the chef “insufferable” and attacking his infamous lisp.

Hytyt even says it’s used as an insult for people who spit in the kitchen he works at as people say: “Alright Jamie, don’t soak the food”.

Next up in the animated debate was those who thought the list was wrong – as the slang wasn’t from the UK.

Many Reddit users seemed to think the slang terms like ‘crikey’ and ‘shotgun’ were better suited to our Australian and American counterparts.

Even though they speak English, Aussies and Yanks have very different slang words to us here in the UK
Even though they speak English, Aussies and Yanks have very different slang words to us here in the UK

They then went on to discuss the usage of the term shotgun, as it’s used differently throughout the UK.

After some commenters had expressed that they wanted to have a copy of this table for reference, someone kindly uploaded a printable version for other foreign expats to make use of.

A printable version of the table was uploaded
A printable version of the table was uploaded

This proved useful for many who said they always struggled when going to meet their British partners’ families.

While some discussed the origins of the words on the table, some useful commenters decided to contribute their own slang.

The word 'peng' has supposedly been around for many years according to this Reddit user
The word ‘peng’ has supposedly been around for many years according to this Reddit user

Apparently the word ‘peng’ has been around for seven or eight years according to Jimofwales on Reddit, but others aren’t so sure they understand its meaning.

As the original post by u/althorno was about a French colleague, 0s3ll4 decided to make this absolute corker of a joke about Monet.

The joke didn't get any responses so perhaps it wasn't deemed funny enough
The joke didn’t get any responses so perhaps it wasn’t deemed funny enough

It read: “Monitarily? Surprised a Francophone can’t spell monet” – in reference to the French artist and the incorrect spelling of monetarily.

Continuing with the theme of French language jokes, this person innocently asked what the French slang was for ‘up the duff’ – as in pregnant.

This sad joke was a response to a genuine question about the French language
This sad joke was a response to a genuine question about the French language

But the reply was simply: “Ruine ta vie” – meaning “ruin your life”.

The next joker decided to take a hit at the tumultuous time of British and US politics – comparing both countries to sinking ships.

We can only assume that the orange character is ~Donald Trump
We can only assume that the orange character is Donald Trump

It read: “If the UK and the US are both ships. The UK is a ship with a hole in it. The US is missing half the ship and it is on fire. There is an orange captain of the ship saying, ‘It is fine, it is a lie that you can’t sail with half a ship.’”

A sad but hilarious conclusion to the responses on Reddit.

The hilarious list of teenage slang translations to help officers posted online by Surrey police
Facebook / Reigate and Banstead Beat

The table used to translate British slang is similar to that used by Surrey Police to help officers understand teenage slang.

They learnt phrases like ‘peng’ and ‘wagwarn’.

When it was shared on Facebook some parents even commented that they found it useful too.


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