AstraZeneca’s vaccine may trigger rare immune response that leads to clots in some people

European scientists believe they have an explanation for the blood clots reported in a tiny number of people who received Oxford-AstraZeneca’s coronavirus vaccine. 

Two separate research teams in Germany and Norway found the shot can in very rare cases cause the body to attack its own blood platelets, causing deadly clots in the brain. 

The experts said that patients who suffer headaches or dizziness four days after getting the jab could be quickly diagnosed with a blood test. 

The German team, which collaborated with scientists in the UK, Ireland and Austria, said its findings meant people should not fear the vaccine. 

However, Norway’s health ministry has used them to justify its ban on the British-made vaccine. 

Several European countries suspended the AZ jab last week after more than 30 patients suffered cerebral sinus vein thrombosis (CSVT). Most of the patients were under the age of 55 and a disproportionate number were women. 

The extremely rare condition, which sees a major vein in the brain become blocked, is thought to have affected fewer than one in 2million vaccinated people. 

German researchers found signs of a type of antibody that forms in response to inflammation in some people and attacks platelets in nine people who developed clots after getting the AstraZeneca shot. These antibodies destroy the platelets and, to make up for the loss, the body overproduces platelets, causing them to clot (file)

German researchers found signs of a type of antibody that forms in response to inflammation in some people and attacks platelets in nine people who developed clots after getting the AstraZeneca shot. These antibodies destroy the platelets and, to make up for the loss, the body overproduces platelets, causing them to clot (file)

German researchers found signs of a type of antibody that forms in response to inflammation in some people and attacks platelets in nine people who developed clots after getting the AstraZeneca shot. These antibodies destroy the platelets and, to make up for the loss, the body overproduces platelets, causing them to clot (file) 

Regulatory reports show that blood clot diagnoses are about equally likely after either the two jabs being used in the UK – slightly higher for Pfizer – and scientists insist the risk is no higher than a random person in the population could expect, meaning the vaccine remains safe. Rates of death soon after vaccination appear higher for AstraZeneca's vaccine but this is likely because it is used in care homes and the people receiving it are naturally more likely to die of any reason

Regulatory reports show that blood clot diagnoses are about equally likely after either the two jabs being used in the UK – slightly higher for Pfizer – and scientists insist the risk is no higher than a random person in the population could expect, meaning the vaccine remains safe. Rates of death soon after vaccination appear higher for AstraZeneca's vaccine but this is likely because it is used in care homes and the people receiving it are naturally more likely to die of any reason

Regulatory reports show that blood clot diagnoses are about equally likely after either the two jabs being used in the UK – slightly higher for Pfizer – and scientists insist the risk is no higher than a random person in the population could expect, meaning the vaccine remains safe. Rates of death soon after vaccination appear higher for AstraZeneca’s vaccine but this is likely because it is used in care homes and the people receiving it are naturally more likely to die of any reason

Figures from AstraZeneca and the European Medicines Agency show the number of blood clot-related conditions from 17million doses dished out in the UK and Europe up to March 13

Figures from AstraZeneca and the European Medicines Agency show the number of blood clot-related conditions from 17million doses dished out in the UK and Europe up to March 13

Figures from AstraZeneca and the European Medicines Agency show the number of blood clot-related conditions from 17million doses dished out in the UK and Europe up to March 13

It comes on the heels of news that Canada is suspending use of the vaccine for people under age of 55 due to blood clot fears

The researchers say the phenomenon is similar to one that seldom occurs with a condition called heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) when sufferers take a drug called heparin.

WHAT IS CSVT? 

Cerebral sinus vein thrombosis (CSVT) is an extremely rare type of blood clot in the brain.

It occurs when the vein that drains blood from the brain is blocked by a blood clot, resulting in potentially deadly bleeding on the brain.  

Symptoms can quickly deteriorate from a headache, blurred vision and faintness to complete loss of control over movement and seizures. 

John Hopkins University estimates it affects five in a million people in the US every year, which would suggest 330 patients in Britain suffer from the condition annually.

According to the university, it can affect patients with low blood pressure, cancer, vascular diseases and those prone to blood clotting. Head injuries can also trigger the condition. 

Britain’s regulator said CSVT is so rare they aren’t even sure how common it is in the general population.

Advertisement

Among those with HIT, the drug triggers the immune system to produce antibodies that activate platelets.

Drugs other than heparin can cause clotting disorders that strongly resemble HIT, and researchers suspect that in rare cases, the AstraZeneca vaccine may be another such trigger.  

Earlier this month, there were about 30 cases of blood clotting among patients after receiving a dose of the vaccine, with a few resulting death.

It led to more than a dozen countries pausing their use of the vaccine, despite the European Medicines Agency declaring the benefits of the shots outweighed the risks.

In a study, published on Research Square on Monday ahead of peer review, the team look at nine cases of blood clots reported in Germany and Austria after getting the AstraZeneca vaccine.

Seven patients had cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), which is a blood clot in the brain; one had a pulmonary embolism, and one had CVT had splanchnic vein thrombosis, which occurs when a vein in the abdomen clots. 

Blood samples from four of the individuals showed they had the same kind of antibodies that activate platelets and initiate clotting in HIT.

These samples were then compared to 20 individuals who were given the AstraZeneca vaccine and did not experience blood clots.

None of this group has these antibodies, 

The researchers advise anyone receiving the AstraZeneca vaccine to keep an eye out for any bruising, swelling or headaches that begin four or more days after being immunized. 

If vaccine recipients identify any of these symptoms early on, the situation can be treated easily by a doctor.

Meanwhile, a group of researchers in Norway say have been studying three cases of blood clots post-AstraZeneca vaccination. 

Professor Pål Andre Holme of Oslo University Hospital told Norwegian newspaper VG that he’s reached the same conclusion, that is due to antibodies causing an overreaction to the vaccine.

‘Our theory that this is a strong immune response that most likely comes after the vaccine,’ Holme said, according to an NPR translation. 

‘There is no other thing than the vaccine that can explain this immune response.’

link

(Visited 102 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply