Australian man found unconscious on Everest after ten climbers died on mountain in just nine days

An Australian climber is fighting for life after he was found unconscious on Mount Everest – where ten climbers have died in nine days. 

The man was rescued at an altitude of 7,500 metres, on the northern slopes, about 7pm on Wednesday, according to China Daily.

Four crew members from the Tibet Himalaya Expedition Company brought the unidentified man down part of the mountain Wednesday evening.

He was reportedly unconscious and in a critical condition. 

The man was rescued (pictured) at an altitude of 7,500 metres, on the northern slopes, about 7pm on Wednesday

The man was rescued (pictured) at an altitude of 7,500 metres, on the northern slopes, about 7pm on Wednesday

The man was rescued (pictured) at an altitude of 7,500 metres, on the northern slopes, about 7pm on Wednesday 

Four crew members from the Tibet Himalaya Expedition Company brought the unidentified man down part of the mountain Wednesday evening (pictured)

Four crew members from the Tibet Himalaya Expedition Company brought the unidentified man down part of the mountain Wednesday evening (pictured)

Four crew members from the Tibet Himalaya Expedition Company brought the unidentified man down part of the mountain Wednesday evening (pictured) 

The news comes as ten climbers died at Everest in nine days, with locals blaming clogged up routes for the toll. Pictured: Climbers queue to stand on the summit of Everest on May 22

The news comes as ten climbers died at Everest in nine days, with locals blaming clogged up routes for the toll. Pictured: Climbers queue to stand on the summit of Everest on May 22

The news comes as ten climbers died at Everest in nine days, with locals blaming clogged up routes for the toll. Pictured: Climbers queue to stand on the summit of Everest on May 22 

By Thursday morning, the climber had been taken to Base Camp where he was then transported to hospital. 

A spokeswoman from The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade said they are ‘providing consular assistance to an Australian man hospitalised in Kathmandu’ in a statement to Daily Mail Australia. 

‘For privacy reasons we are unable to provide further details,’ they said.  

The Australian climber has reportedly stabilised.  

The news comes after ten climbers died on Everest in nine days, with locals blaming clogged up routes for the death toll.

Climbers waiting in queues while climbing are sucking up mountaineers’ limited oxygen supply and exposing them to the harsher winds for longer. 

The route up the mountain includes several large obstacles including a huge moving glacier near to base camp as shown in the map above

The route up the mountain includes several large obstacles including a huge moving glacier near to base camp as shown in the map above

The route up the mountain includes several large obstacles including a huge moving glacier near to base camp as shown in the map above

The 10 climbers who have died on Everest in the past nine days 

May 16: Irish professor Séamus Lawless went missing on May 16 after reportedly falling. 

The search operation has since been called off and he is presumed dead.

This week: Four Indians, one Austrian, one American and one person from Nepal died on Everest.

Friday: Irishman Kevin Hynes, 56, passed away on the northern Tibet part of the mountain.

The father-of-two died in his tent at 23,000ft on the descent after turning back before reaching the top.

Saturday: Robin Haynes Fisher, 44, collapsed and died only 150m from the peak.   

Hiking officials attributed most of the deaths to weakness, exhaustion and delays on the crowded route to the 29,030-foot (8,850-metre) summit.  

British climber Robin Haynes Fisher, 44, died in the ‘death zone’ – known for low oxygen levels – on his descent on Saturday after speaking of his worries about overcrowding on the world’s highest mountain.  

In one of his last social media posts, he told of how he had changed his plans in order to avoid the ‘fatal’ crowds.

He said: ‘With a single route to the summit, delays caused by overcrowding could prove fatal so I am hopeful my decision to go for the 25th will mean fewer people. Unless of course everyone else plays the same waiting game.’

Mr Fisher was described as an ‘aspirational adventurer’ who ‘lived life to the full’ in a statement from his family.

Robin Haynes Fisher

Robin Haynes Fisher

Robin Haynes Fisher, 44, died in the ‘death zone’ of Mount Everest – known for its low oxygen levels and had previously told of his worries around overcrowding on the mountain

Irish climber Kevin Hynes, 56, died in his tent at 7,000 metres in the early hours of Friday after turning back before reaching the summit.

The father-of-two was part of a group from UK-based climbing company 360 Expeditions which was attempting to scale Everest.

His death comes a week after Trinity College professor Seamus Lawless, aged 39 and from Bray, Co Wicklow, fell during his descent from the peak having achieved a lifetime ambition of reaching the summit.

The search for Mr Lawless has been called off.

An American climber, Austrian climber and two Indian climbers are also reported to have died.

Seamus Lawless 39, from Bray, Ireland, fell during his descent from the peak having achieved a lifetime ambition of reaching the summit. Above: Mr Lawless after scaling Alaska's 20,000-ft Mount Denali last summer

Seamus Lawless 39, from Bray, Ireland, fell during his descent from the peak having achieved a lifetime ambition of reaching the summit. Above: Mr Lawless after scaling Alaska's 20,000-ft Mount Denali last summer

Seamus Lawless 39, from Bray, Ireland, fell during his descent from the peak having achieved a lifetime ambition of reaching the summit. Above: Mr Lawless after scaling Alaska’s 20,000-ft Mount Denali last summer

Mr Fisher was the tenth fatality on Everest in the current climbing season that ends this month and the 18th in Nepal’s Himalayas in the same period. 

Record numbers of climbers are cramming on to the piste during the spring season’s good weather.

There are 41 teams with a total of 378 climbers permitted to scale the mountain during the spring climbing season in Nepal that begins around March.

An equal number of Nepalese guides are helping them get to the summit.

photo link

(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply