BBC reporter is interrupted by her daughter

A BBC reporter has left social media users in hysterics after she revealed her reporting had been crashed by her young daughter. 

Anna Holligan, who is the foreign correspondent in The Hague, shared outtakes from her attempts to film a piece to camera on Twitter last night, writing: ‘Oh the joys of breaking news on a non school day.’ 

During the short video, Anna could be seen encouraging Zena to lean back into her pram, meaning she would not be visible to the camera, saying: ‘Baby, go back and chat to Elsa, behind the scarf, just for a minute.’

But the playful four-year-old appeared determined to capture her mother’s attention, leaning out of the pram, chattering away, and shouting: ‘Mummy!’

Anna Holligan, who is the foreign correspondent in The Hague, left viewers in hysterics after she revealed her reporting has been interrupted crashed by her young daughter

Anna Holligan, who is the foreign correspondent in The Hague, left viewers in hysterics after she revealed her reporting has been interrupted crashed by her young daughter

Anna Holligan, who is the foreign correspondent in The Hague, left viewers in hysterics after she revealed her reporting has been interrupted crashed by her young daughter

During the clip, Anna could be seen trying to deliver a piece to camera for the 10 o’clock news about changes to the Eurovision song contest.

Zena could be seen leaning out of the pram holding a phone, chatting away to her mother, apparently oblivious to the fact Anna was trying to work.

As Anna tried to deliver her script to camera, Zena gabbled away, interrupting her at one point to say loudly: ‘Can you hear Mummy talking?’

The reporter  closed her eyes to compose herself before her daughter could be seen leaning fully out of the pram and into the full view of the camera, saying: ‘Mummy!’

During the short video, Anna could be seen encouraging Zena to lean back into her pram, meaning she would not be visible to the camera

During the short video, Anna could be seen encouraging Zena to lean back into her pram, meaning she would not be visible to the camera

During the short video, Anna could be seen encouraging Zena to lean back into her pram, meaning she would not be visible to the camera

Zena could be seen leaning out of the pram holding a phone, chatting away to her mother, apparently oblivious to the fact Anna was trying to work.

Zena could be seen leaning out of the pram holding a phone, chatting away to her mother, apparently oblivious to the fact Anna was trying to work.

Zena could be seen leaning out of the pram holding a phone, chatting away to her mother, apparently oblivious to the fact Anna was trying to work.

Zena could be seen leaning out of the pram holding a phone, chatting away to her mother, apparently oblivious to the fact Anna was trying to work.

Zena could be seen leaning out of the pram holding a phone, chatting away to her mother, apparently oblivious to the fact Anna was trying to work

As she finished reading her script, she laughed and turned to Zena saying: ‘Come on!’

Anna went on to post the full package on her Twitter account, writing: ‘And here’s the take that made the cut. 

‘If you didn’t know she was in the bike, would you even notice? Four and a half years of juggling work and child, still trying to nail it, does anyone, ever?’

Other Twitter users were blown away by the clip, with one writing: ‘You are my hero! Love you both.’

The reporter closed her eyes to compose herself before her daughter could be seen leaning fully out of the pram and into the full view of the camera

The reporter closed her eyes to compose herself before her daughter could be seen leaning fully out of the pram and into the full view of the camera

The reporter closed her eyes to compose herself before her daughter could be seen leaning fully out of the pram and into the full view of the camera

Another commented: ‘ Who cares about Eurovision. Give the girl a full programme!’

‘Your child is very clever! He or she was helping you transmitting the news,’ another said.

A fourth wrote: ‘A budding journalist you have there.’ 

It’s far from the first time journalists have been interrupted by their children while trying to work during the pandemic. 

Other Twitter users were blown away by the clip, with some saying Zena should have her own programme

Other Twitter users were blown away by the clip, with some saying Zena should have her own programme

Other Twitter users were blown away by the clip, with some saying Zena should have her own programme 

Last year, Dr Clare Wenham, from South London, appeared on BBC News to discuss the coronavirus crisis when her daughter Scarlett began rearranging a unicorn picture behind her, and even struck up a conversation with the newsreader.   

After Dr Wenham apologised, Scarlett remained in the room and began rearranging a shelf behind her, trying to figure out where to put a picture she had painted of a unicorn. 

‘Mummy, where do you want this picture,  she asked, before repeating, ‘Mummy, where do you want it?’ 

After attempting to continue the interview, Christian gave in and addressed the little girl saying: ‘Scarlett, I think it looks better on the lower shelf. It’s a lovely unicorn.’ 

Upon hearing her name mentioned, Scarlett asked her mother: ‘Mummy, what’s his name?’ 

Dr Clare Wenham (pictured), from South London, appeared on BBC News last year to discuss the coronavirus crisis

Dr Clare Wenham (pictured), from South London, appeared on BBC News last year to discuss the coronavirus crisis

Dr Clare Wenham (pictured), from South London, appeared on BBC News last year to discuss the coronavirus crisis

‘My name is Christian,’ replied the newsreader. 

Scarlett went on: ‘Christian, I’m just deciding where it can go and where mummy wants it to go.’

‘I think just on that shelf is great, thank you,’ said Dr Wenham, ‘I’m so sorry’.

The presenter remained in good spirits about the interview, joking that it was ‘the most informative interview I’ve done all day’. 

Scarlett began rearranging a shelf behind her, trying to figure out where to put a picture she had painted of a unicorn

Scarlett began rearranging a shelf behind her, trying to figure out where to put a picture she had painted of a unicorn

Scarlett began rearranging a shelf behind her, trying to figure out where to put a picture she had painted of a unicorn

After attempting to continue the interview, host Christian Fraser gave in and addressed the little girl and she asked him his name

After attempting to continue the interview, host Christian Fraser gave in and addressed the little girl and she asked him his name

After attempting to continue the interview, host Christian Fraser gave in and addressed the little girl and she asked him his name 

Viewers were left in hysterics, with one writing: ‘I love kids. They don’t care if mum has an important BBC interview. They must attend to the much more important matter of WHICH SHELF TO PUT THE UNICORN PICTURE.’ 

Meanwhile Sky New’s Foreign Affairs editor Deborah, faced a similar situation from her home in Kent, when her son entered the room in search of biscuits while she was being interviewed by presenter Mark Austin.  

Deborah was seen stopping mid-sentence as her son opened the door and came in, saying: ‘Hold on that’s my son arriving, really embarrassing.’ 

‘Can I have two biscuits’, he asks, to which the journalist replied: ‘Yes, you can have two biscuits, really sorry about that.’ 

Sky New's Foreign Affairs editor Deborah apologised after her son entered the room in search of biscuits while she was being interviewed by presenter Mark Austin

Sky New's Foreign Affairs editor Deborah apologised after her son entered the room in search of biscuits while she was being interviewed by presenter Mark Austin

Sky New’s Foreign Affairs editor Deborah apologised after her son entered the room in search of biscuits while she was being interviewed by presenter Mark Austin

Mark, 61, London, then cuts the interview short saying: ‘We’ll leave Deborah Haynes there, in full family swing’. 

Viewers found the incident hilarious, with several teasing that the toddler had chosen the perfect time to ‘gain leverage in the snack negotiations’. 

‘Send the kid to Brussels to lead the Biscuit negotiations. Let’s get biscuits done’, wrote one. 

 While lockdown may exacerbated the volume of children dropping in on their parent’s interview, it was a peril of those working from home long before the pandemic.

Mark, 61, London, then cuts the interview short saying: 'We'll leave Deborah Haynes there, in full family swing'

Mark, 61, London, then cuts the interview short saying: 'We'll leave Deborah Haynes there, in full family swing'

Mark, 61, London, then cuts the interview short saying: ‘We’ll leave Deborah Haynes there, in full family swing’

In 2017, Robert Kelly, an associate professor of Political Science at Pusan National University in Busan won the hearts of the nation when his two children interrupted in on air.

Hilarious footage showed expert Robert, 47, handling serious questions on the country’s president, Park Geun-hye, being ousted from power.

But suddenly, a toddler bursts into the room in a bright yellow top and performs a comical dance behind the Cleveland, Ohio, native.

The interviewees toddler bursts into the room in a bright yellow top and performs a hilarious dance behind him

The interviewees toddler bursts into the room in a bright yellow top and performs a hilarious dance behind him

The interviewees toddler bursts into the room in a bright yellow top and performs a hilarious dance behind him

Kelly focuses entirely on the camera as he attempts to blindly hand off his daughter, who is clearly curious as to who he is talking to.

And his parental problems soon double as a baby also excitedly makes his way into the room under his own power in a walker.

To complete the farce, his wife Jung-a Kim then comes skidding through the threshold.

Both parties try to keep their cool despite the hilarious interruption from his young child

Both parties try to keep their cool despite the hilarious interruption from his young child

Both parties try to keep their cool despite the hilarious interruption from his young child

She grabs the two youngsters and attempts to drag them out of the door, but one of them can be heard wailing and the baby’s walker suddenly won’t fit back through the door.

Eventually, she manages to get them both out, and the interview continues.

When the interview finishes, broadcaster James Mernendez says: ‘There’s a first time for everything. I think you’ve got some children who need you!’  

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