Biden deploys four B-1 bombers to Norway in message to Putin

President Joe Biden is deploying four Air Force B-1 bombers to Norway to express to Russia‘s Vladimir Putin that the U.S. will defend allies if Russia shows aggression in the Arctic. 

CNN reported the move Monday, saying that bombers and approximately 200 Americans stationed at Dyess Air Force base in Texas will be deployed to Orland Air Base in Norway. 

Within three weeks, missions will begin in the Arctic Circle and in international airspace off of Russia’s northwest coast, the network said.   

President Joe Biden

President Joe Biden

Russian President Vladimir Putin

Russian President Vladimir Putin

President Joe Biden (left) is deploying four Air Force B-1 bombers to Norway to express to Russia ‘s Vladimir Putin (right) that the U.S. will defend allies if Russia shows aggression in the Arctic

Air Force B-1 bombers are being deployed to Norway by President Joe Biden to express to Russian President Vladimir Putin that the U.S. won't tolerate an aggressive Arctic posturing

Air Force B-1 bombers are being deployed to Norway by President Joe Biden to express to Russian President Vladimir Putin that the U.S. won't tolerate an aggressive Arctic posturing

Air Force B-1 bombers are being deployed to Norway by President Joe Biden to express to Russian President Vladimir Putin that the U.S. won’t tolerate an aggressive Arctic posturing 

Four B-1 bombers will be deployed to Norway as a show of strength to Russia as President Joe Biden's administration takes a stronger stance than the previous American administration

Four B-1 bombers will be deployed to Norway as a show of strength to Russia as President Joe Biden's administration takes a stronger stance than the previous American administration

Four B-1 bombers will be deployed to Norway as a show of strength to Russia as President Joe Biden’s administration takes a stronger stance than the previous American administration 

Now President Joe Biden (left) shakes hands with Russian President Vladimir Putin (right) during a meeting in Moscow in 2011, when Biden was vice president

Now President Joe Biden (left) shakes hands with Russian President Vladimir Putin (right) during a meeting in Moscow in 2011, when Biden was vice president

Now President Joe Biden (left) shakes hands with Russian President Vladimir Putin (right) during a meeting in Moscow in 2011, when Biden was vice president 

Previously, American military missions over the Arctic originated from the United Kingdom. 

The move to Norway signals the U.S. is more prepared to tackle Russian aggression in the area. 

Bomber missions take weeks to plan, CNN reported, so the Norway deployment has been in the works for awhile. 

Biden has made it clear he plans to take a much harder stand against Russia than his predecessor, President Donald Trump.  

He spoke with Putin six days into his presidency. 

And while he agreed to extend the START treaty between the U.S. and Russia for five years, Biden said in a speech Thursday at the State Department that he wasn’t so agreeable with Putin in other areas.   

‘At the same time, I made it clear to President Putin, in a manner very different from my predecessor, that the days of the United States rolling over in the face of Russia’s aggressive actions interfering with our elections, cyber attacks, poisoning its citizens, are over,’ Biden said.

The new president said he would not hesitate to ‘raise the cost on Russia’ if need be. 

He also called out Putin for the ‘politically motivated’ imprisonment of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, calling for Navalny to be freed ‘immediately.’ 

‘Mr. Navalny, like all Russian citizens, is entitled to his rights under the Russian constitution,’ the president continued. ‘He’s been targeted targeted for exposing corruption. He should be released immediately and without condition.’ 

Navalny was poisoned in August and then arrested last month for violating parole stemming from a 2014 charge, which had barred him from running for office. 

CNN reported that the Defense Department has been concerned about Russia’s moves in the Arctic, as the country could try to shut off access to maritime passageways and natural resources, with 25 per cent of Russia’s gross domestic product tied to hydrocarbons found north of the Arctic Circle. 

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