Boeing 737 carrying more than 100 passengers slides off runway in Russia

A Boeing 737 jet carrying more than 100 people slid off a runway as it landed during a snowstorm in Russia

The NordStar plane with 101 passengers and six crew members on board slipped off course in the city of Norilsk yesterday. 

The airline said no-one had been hurt and that passengers had been able to leave the plane by themselves.

It comes just days after a similar incident involving the same model of jet in Florida in which the jet skidded off the runway and ended up in a river, injuring 22. 

A Boeing 737 jet carrying more than 100 people slid off a runway as it landed during a snowstorm in Russia yesterday (pictured, the plane in the remote city of Norilsk)

A Boeing 737 jet carrying more than 100 people slid off a runway as it landed during a snowstorm in Russia yesterday (pictured, the plane in the remote city of Norilsk)

A Boeing 737 jet carrying more than 100 people slid off a runway as it landed during a snowstorm in Russia yesterday (pictured, the plane in the remote city of Norilsk)

A worker in a high-visibility jacket stands underneath the nose of the plane in Norilsk after the Boeing plane slid off the runway

A worker in a high-visibility jacket stands underneath the nose of the plane in Norilsk after the Boeing plane slid off the runway

A worker in a high-visibility jacket stands underneath the nose of the plane in Norilsk after the Boeing plane slid off the runway 

In the Russian incident, the plane was not damaged, NordStar said, as they blamed the accident on the poor weather conditions. 

The crew were hindered by 60mph winds and a snowstorm which reduced visibility, the airline said. 

The plane had reportedly circled Norilsk for two hours before attempting the landing at the remote city’s Alykel airport which led to the incident.  

According to Russian news agency TASS the plane was on its way from Krasnoyarsk to Norilsk, both cities in Siberia. 

An airline source said the plane had ‘slightly skidded off the runway into a security zone’.  

The alarming incident in Norilsk was unrelated to the air disaster in Moscow on Sunday in which 41 people died.  

It is the second such incident involving a Boeing 737-800 in a matter of days.

On Friday a jetliner slid off a runway into a river at a Florida military base, injuring 22 people. 

Workers under one of the planes' wings in the remote Siberian city where more than 100 passengers were on board the plane

Workers under one of the planes' wings in the remote Siberian city where more than 100 passengers were on board the plane

Workers under one of the planes’ wings in the remote Siberian city where more than 100 passengers were on board the plane 

In hot water: A Boeing 737 lies in the St Johns River in Florida after slipping off the runway on Friday, in the first of two such incidents within days

In hot water: A Boeing 737 lies in the St Johns River in Florida after slipping off the runway on Friday, in the first of two such incidents within days

In hot water: A Boeing 737 lies in the St Johns River in Florida after slipping off the runway on Friday, in the first of two such incidents within days 

It landed during a thunderstorm at Naval Air Station Jacksonville and was arriving from Naval Station Guantanamo Bay in Cuba with 136 passengers and seven crew. 

The plane slid off the end of the runway into shallow water and sank up to its wings, forcing passengers to walk along the wings to safety. 

U.S. federal investigators on Saturday began investigating the reason for the incident. 

Boeing has been under huge pressure in recent months after two of its Max 8 jets crashed in Indonesia and Ethiopia, killing a combined 346 people.  

Some 189 people died when the Lion Air flight crashed into the Java Sea shortly after taking off from Jakarta on October 29.

Boeing has faced severe pressure after the deadly Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines crashes. Pictured: the very Boeing 737 Max 8 jet which crashed in Ethiopia on March 10

Boeing has faced severe pressure after the deadly Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines crashes. Pictured: the very Boeing 737 Max 8 jet which crashed in Ethiopia on March 10

Boeing has faced severe pressure after the deadly Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines crashes. Pictured: the very Boeing 737 Max 8 jet which crashed in Ethiopia on March 10

In the Ethiopian Airlines disaster, 157 people died six minutes after the plane took off from Addis Ababa on March 10.  

In both cases, the pilots lost control soon after take-off and fought a losing battle to stop their jets plunging down. 

Last week the company’s CEO Dennis Muilenburg defended the planemaking giant’s safety record. 

Mr Muilenburg denied that the Max was rushed to market and said Boeing followed the same design and certification process it has always used. 

‘As in most accidents, there are a chain of events that occurred,’ he said, referring to the two crashes. 

‘It’s not correct to attribute that to any single item.’   

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