Boris Johnson blasted over ‘lack of progress’ with new counter-terror laws after Streatham carnage

Sudesh Amman, 20, from Harrow, fantasised about carrying out a terror attack with a blade or with acid while riding a moped and had been jailed in 2018 - before being released a few days ago

Sudesh Amman, 20, from Harrow, fantasised about carrying out a terror attack with a blade or with acid while riding a moped and had been jailed in 2018 - before being released a few days ago

Sudesh Amman, 20, from Harrow, fantasised about carrying out a terror attack with a blade or with acid while riding a moped and had been jailed in 2018 – before being released a few days ago 

Boris Johnson faced fury today as an Islamist terrorist was freed from prison early only to commit a bloody atrocity days later – despite his pledge to keep them behind bars for longer.

The Prime Minister promised there would be ‘fundamental changes’ to the system for dealing with convicted extremists after Sudesh Amman‘s rampage in south London.

The 20-year-old walked free last week,  halfway through a three years and four month sentence for for 13 terror offences. On Sunday he rampaged through Streatham high street, stabbing two before he was shot dead.

In the Queen’s Speech before Christmas, following his December election win, Mr Johnson pledged to end the early release of of dangerous terrorists and introduce minimum 14 year jail terms.

He first made the commitment in the wake of November’s deadly London Bridge attack. 

But the required legislation has yet to be passed by MPs as politicians concentrated on getting Brexit done.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan said he was ‘angry’ this morning at the ‘lack of progress’, saying the Streatham attack on Sunday was ‘clearly foreseeable’.

He told ITV’s Good Morning Britain: ‘One of the things we were promised in November when we had the two fatalities is that the Government would learn the lessons and make sure they would change the policies they brought in a few years ago…

‘But for an inch this way or that way, but for the brilliance of the medics and the speed of the police, there would have been two fatalities and many more.

‘And that’s one of the reasons why I’m not just frustrated but I’m angry at the changes made in the past and the lack of progress in making the changes we were promised in November.’

Amman lies face down on a south London pavement after he was shot by undercover officers following his stabbing rampage during which two were wounded

Amman lies face down on a south London pavement after he was shot by undercover officers following his stabbing rampage during which two were wounded

Amman lies face down on a south London pavement after he was shot by undercover officers following his stabbing rampage during which two were wounded

The Prime Minister promised there would be 'fundamental changes' to the system for dealing with convicted extremists after Sudesh Amman 's rampage in south London

The Prime Minister promised there would be 'fundamental changes' to the system for dealing with convicted extremists after Sudesh Amman 's rampage in south London

The Prime Minister promised there would be ‘fundamental changes’ to the system for dealing with convicted extremists after Sudesh Amman ‘s rampage in south London

And local Streatham MP Bell Ribeiro-Addy said: ‘The perpetrator didn’t serve his full sentence which is questionable – what is more questionable is why he needed to be under surveillance.

If someone needs to be under surveillance it brings the question on why they were released in the first place.’ 

Mr Johnson’s comments last night echoed those made after London‘s last terror attack when two people were killed by convicted terrorist Usman Khan at Fishmongers’ Hall in December.  

Khan, 28, had been attending a prisoner rehabilitation event after being released on licence in December 2018.

‘If you are convicted of a serious terrorist offence, there should be a mandatory minimum sentence of 14 years – and some should never be released,’ the Prime Minster said then.

‘Further, for all terrorism and extremist offences the sentence announced by the judge must be the time actually served – these criminals must serve every day of their sentence, with no exceptions.’

Mr Johnson has now said the Government has ‘moved quickly’ to introduce measures to strengthen the UK’s response to terrorism.

Last month details of The Counter Terrorism (Sentencing and Release) Bill were released.

They included forcing dangerous terrorists who receive extended determinate sentences to serve the whole time behind bars, and scrapping early release from jail for those classed as dangerous and handed extended determinate sentences.

Boris Johnson has promised there will be 'fundamental changes' to the system for dealing with convicted terrorists after Sunday's attack by a newly-released prisoner

Boris Johnson has promised there will be 'fundamental changes' to the system for dealing with convicted terrorists after Sunday's attack by a newly-released prisoner

Boris Johnson has promised there will be ‘fundamental changes’ to the system for dealing with convicted terrorists after Sunday’s attack by a newly-released prisoner

Terrorists deemed not to be a risk would have to serve two-thirds of their sentence before the Parole Board could consider them for release, as part of the bill.

Shortly after the December attack, Home Office figures showed more than 350 convicted and suspected terrorists had been freed from prison over the previous seven years.

Overall, 353 terror criminals and suspects had been released from prison between June 2012 and the same period in 2019, of which 245 were convicted of offences. 

Rory Stewart, the former Tory prisons minister and now an independent candidate for Mayor of London said: ‘We should be reassured that armed officers were able to be on the scene as quickly as they were.’

Asked at the scene about rehabilitation and de-radicalisation, he said: ‘Someone that has committed a crime such as this man will have a limited time determined by a judge and they will eventually get out. 

‘The key is what work you do with them once they are in prison and the work you do when they are out of prison.’

 

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