British ‘Beatles gang’ jihadi says ‘White Widow’ Sally Jones WAS killed by airstrike

A member of the so-called ‘Beatles’ gang of British ISIS terrorists says ‘White Widow’ Sally Jones was killed in an airstrike in 2017 alongside her 12-year-old son.

Alexanda Kotey said the former L’Oreal saleswoman, 50, and son Jojo died in a bombardment near the Syria-Iraq border close to where he was staying days after the Manchester terror attack in what he called a ‘retaliation’ by US-led forces.

Former punk rocker Jones fled to Syria with her son in 2013 before becoming a recruiter for the ISIS terror group.

In October 2017 reports emerged that she and her son were killed by a Predator drone, but it was speculated she may still be alive in March 2018 when she was placed on a list of most-dangerous ISIS operatives by the US. 

Alexanda Kotey told ITV News she and Jojo died in an air strike on May 25, 2017, three days after the suicide bombing following an Ariana Grande gig that killed 22 people.

British jihadi Sally Jones, pictured, WAS killed in an air strike in 2017, according to Alexanda Kotey, a member of the so-called ‘Beatles’ gang of British ISIS terrorists

Kotey (pictured), who was captured by Kurdish fighters in Syria last year, said the 'White Widow' died alongside her son in a building in Al-Mayadin in eastern Syria when it was levelled by a US-led coalition in 'retaliation for the Manchester bombing'

Kotey (pictured), who was captured by Kurdish fighters in Syria last year, said the 'White Widow' died alongside her son in a building in Al-Mayadin in eastern Syria when it was levelled by a US-led coalition in 'retaliation for the Manchester bombing'

Kotey (pictured), who was captured by Kurdish fighters in Syria last year, said the ‘White Widow’ died alongside her son in a building in Al-Mayadin in eastern Syria when it was levelled by a US-led coalition in ‘retaliation for the Manchester bombing’

Kotey said Jones and her son Jojo, pictured, died after a building they were in was shelled in eastern Syria in 'retaliation' for the Manchester terror attack

Kotey said Jones and her son Jojo, pictured, died after a building they were in was shelled in eastern Syria in 'retaliation' for the Manchester terror attack

Kotey said Jones and her son Jojo, pictured, died after a building they were in was shelled in eastern Syria in ‘retaliation’ for the Manchester terror attack

Jones, pictured wielding a rifle in Syria, fled to the country in 2013 and went on to become an ISIS recruiter

Jones, pictured wielding a rifle in Syria, fled to the country in 2013 and went on to become an ISIS recruiter

Jones, pictured wielding a rifle in Syria, fled to the country in 2013 and went on to become an ISIS recruiter

He said the pair were in staying in a municipality building in Al-Mayadin in eastern Syria and were among dozens killed when it was levelled. 

Who was the White Widow? How Sally Jones went from L’Oreal saleswoman to ISIS terrorist 

Jones, pictured, was a grandmother who came from Chatham in Kent before becoming one of the world's 'most-wanted' terrorists

Jones, pictured, was a grandmother who came from Chatham in Kent before becoming one of the world's 'most-wanted' terrorists

Jones, pictured, was a grandmother who came from Chatham in Kent before becoming one of the world’s ‘most-wanted’ terrorists 

Sally Jones, 50, a grandmother from Chatham in Kent, was once considered Britain’s most wanted woman and was a recruiter and propagandist for ISIS.

A former L’Oreal saleswoman, she lived in a council house in Chatham before fleeing to Syria in 2013, after falling for hacker jihadi Junaid Hussain online.

Born in South-East London, she was the only daughter of a greengrocer turned lorry driver and her older brother runs a business in the Home Counties.

Jones was still a girl when her parents divorced and was 10 years old when her father committed suicide after taking an overdose.

She was raised as a Catholic and attended Christian youth groups in her teens and early twenties.

She left school at the age of 16 to work as a beautician and later became interested in punk music, joining the all-girl band Krunch, for which she played bass guitar.

However her music career was put on hold when she fell pregnant with her on-off boyfriend, labourer Jonathan Wilkinson.

But two years after their son was born in 1996, 29-year-old Wilkinson died from liver cirrhosis.

Her eldest son Jonathan, now 21, from Kent, become a father in September 2014.

A chaotic and self-destructive lifestyle that ensued led her to an online dating site, where she first met Hussain, whose mother was a Birmingham school dinner lady.

Then a mother-of-two, Jones fled to the Middle East in 2013 with Hussain and her younger boy JoJo, now 12, leaving her elder son behind.

The former benefits claimant went on to be put in charge of the female wing of an IS battalion of foreign fighters.

Her and her husband became notorious for their involvement in ISIS and were nicknamed ‘Mr and Mrs Terror’.

The pair were accused of plotting terror attacks across three continents and were even linked to a plot to blow up the Queen and Prince Philip during VJ celebrations two years ago.

Jones became known as the White Widow after Hussain was killed in a drone strike in August 2015. Since then she is believed to have risen through the ranks of the terror group.

Following Hussain’s death, she tweeted that she was proud her ‘husband was killed by the biggest enemy of Allah’ and that she would ‘never love anyone but him’.

In 2015 it emerged that Jones was grooming British teenage girls online under the Islamic name Sakinah Hussain.

Jones then tried to persuade the young girls to travel to the Middle East and become jihadi brides. 

She was killed alongside her son in 2017 as she tried to flee Raqqa as coalition forces moved in. 

Kotey, who was captured by Kurdish fighters in Syria last year, said: ‘There was a building that was shelled, she lived in the building. It was shelled following the incident in Manchester, which I believe was a retaliation.’

‘There were families in the building, it was a government building. (Forty) people were dead as a result… including Sally Jones and her son’.

Previously, Kotey admitted he was behind a plot to kill soldiers and police in west London

He told ITV he had funnelled cash to UK extremists and tried to arrange a massacre in Shepherd’s Bush.

Kotey also acknowledged his contacts with fellow British terrorist Mohammed Emwazi, the ISIS killer nicknamed ‘Jihadi John’. 

He said the pair had worked as ‘hostage keepers’ in Syria to extract information from prisoners such as journalist James Foley, who was beheaded by Emwazi in 2014.

Kotey said the planned London killing spree, which was foiled in 2014, was supposed to be part of a wider plan to create sleeper cells in European countries.

‘The idea was to plant people in countries so that if there was any aggression from these countries they would have people who would conduct a mission,’ he said. 

Discussing his role with Emwazi he said the Londoners had  joined Islamic State in Idlib as regular fighters in 2012. 

Following an ‘order from above’ they were relocated to Aleppo, where there were more Western prisoners, he said. 

‘When that order came for [Emwazi] to move to the countryside he requested that we accompany him,’ he said. 

‘They were more in number [the prisoners] ,they had gathered them in one place, different nationalities, varying nationalities.

‘[At] this point it was instructed to extract email addresses from them to open up communication. 

‘This was mostly before, in the time of Idlib – the time of Aleppo there wasn’t really that kind of interaction between myself and the prisoners.

‘It was go and take the necessary information and leave,’ he said.

Despite admitting his association with Emwazi, known for carrying out several filmed beheadings, Kotey denied any involvement with those killings.

‘I don’t see in my case it makes a very big difference if I was actually there or not there,’ he said.

However U.S. officials said Kotey and fellow ‘Beatle’ El Shafee Elsheikh ‘are suspected to have participated in the detention, exploitation and execution of Western detainees’.  

Kotey is under guard in the caliphate’s former heartland having fallen into the hands of Kurdish militia fighters in January. 

Emwazi was killed in a US air strike in 2015 after appearing in a number of videos in which captives including British aid workers David Haines and Alan Henning were beheaded. 

The fourth gang member, Aine Davis, was convicted of being a member of a terrorist organisation and jailed in Turkey in May 2017. 

The four Londoners were linked to a string of hostage murders in Iraq and Syria during the bloody Islamist uprising and gained global notoriety.

Two further men were jailed for life over the Shepherd’s Bush terror plot in 2016. 

Tarik Hassane and Suhaib Majeed were imprisoned at the Old Bailey for conspiracy to murder and preparation of terrorist acts. 

Hassane had identified Shepherd’s Bush police station and the Parachute Regiment Territorial Army Barracks at White City as possible targets on Google Street View.

Kotey has also acknowledged his contacts with fellow British terrorist Mohammed Emwazi, the ISIS killer nicknamed 'Jihadi John' (pictured)

Kotey has also acknowledged his contacts with fellow British terrorist Mohammed Emwazi, the ISIS killer nicknamed 'Jihadi John' (pictured)

Kotey has also acknowledged his contacts with fellow British terrorist Mohammed Emwazi, the ISIS killer nicknamed ‘Jihadi John’ (pictured)

The judge told the pair: ‘It is shocking, tragic and deplorable that you, two young British men, educated through the UK school system, undertaking university courses, should be so influenced by the bloodthirsty version of Islam presented by Isis and other similarly minded groups, that you decided to take up arms against your fellow British citizens and those charged with protecting them in the streets of your own city.’   

Prosecutor Brian Altman QC had said Hassane and Majeed were heavily influenced by the rise of Islamic State, which pronounced a caliphate in June 2014.

Within days, Hassane pledged his allegiance to IS and encouraged his friends to follow suit. He was pictured posing with a gun in one hand and a book on Osama bin Laden in the other.

His close friend Majeed was studying at the prestigious King’s College London and was chairman of its Islamic society.

Mohammed Emwazi, also known as Jihadi John

Mohammed Emwazi, also known as Jihadi John

Aine Davis, another of the ISIS Beatles

Aine Davis, another of the ISIS Beatles

Mohammed Emwazi (left), also known as Jihadi John, and Aine Davis (right), who was jailed in 2017 in Turkey for belonging to the terror group 

The court heard that Majeed sent a picture of a dead fighter ‘laughing’ to a Telegram chat group named Turnup Terror Squad, of which Hassane was also a member.

And he had a ‘grim’ video of Jihadi John beheading a journalist on his iPad, jurors were told.  

Acting on instructions from mastermind Tarik Hassane, physics student Majeed had got his hands on a gun and ammunition and was discussing buying an untraceable moped before police swooped to arrest him in September 2014.

His old school friend Hassane, nicknamed The Surgeon, was studying medicine in Sudan at the time but rushed back to London to carry on as a ‘lone wolf terrorist’ before he too was picked up. 

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