Bullish Boris Johnson is willing to resign and risk putting Corbyn in No10 rather than delay Brexit

BULLISH Boris Johnson is willing to take the nuclear option of resigning and risk a Jeremy Corbyn government rather than delay Brexit.

Opposition parties yesterday agreed to reject any fresh bid for an October election.

Bullish Boris Johnson is willing to step down in order to ensure Brexit is not delayed beyond October 31
Reuters

But sources said Mr Johnson — who tussled with a bull during a visit to Scotland to see the Queen — would rather quit than extend negotiations with the EU into November.

If he resigns, Jeremy Corbyn would have an obligation to try to form a government. Tory chiefs then hope they could force an election if he has delayed Brexit beyond October 31.

One source told Sun columnist James Forsyth: “The public increasingly realise that MPs and Jeremy Corbyn want to delay Brexit and Boris wants to get this done. That’s good for us and bad for them.”

No10 advisers are in talks to try to find a “third way” — or “any other way” — out of the deadlock.

The Bill ruling out No Deal passed the House of Lords and should gain Royal Assent on Monday — forcing Mr Johnson to ask Brussels for an extension.

But James Forsyth reveals the PM, who last night arrived at Balmoral with girlfriend Carrie Symonds, would never write the letter.

He also says Mr Johnson could ask the Queen not to approve the Bill — and dare MPs to bring him down.

Another option is to phrase the demand for an extension in a way that is bound to be refused.

The revelations came as:

  • MR Johnson branded Labour, the Lib Dems and SNP cowards for not having the “guts” for an election;
  • SOURCES said Downing Street has already begun discussions with TV channels over election debates between Mr Johnson and Mr Corbyn;
  • TORY insiders claimed the party would put up a candidate against Speaker John Bercow amid Brexiteer fury over his Remain bias, and;
  • FORMER energy minister Claire Perry became the latest senior MP to reveal she would not be standing at an upcoming election.

Mr Corbyn spoke with the leaders of the main opposition parties yesterday to agree to resist any Tory call for an early poll before the risk of a No Deal on October 31 is eliminated.

They are all understood to be planning to vote against or abstain any fresh bid for an election under the Fixed-Term Parliament Act. No10 had hoped to force an election to give them a clear Brexit mandate before the EU Council on October 17.

Another wrangle

THE PM took a bull by the horns yesterday — and pledged to invest in Britain.

Boris cajoled the beast across a field on a trip to Aberdeenshire where he unveiled a £50million boost for Scottish farmers.

At Peterhead fish market his spending was limited to a winning £185 bid for a box of cod.

After mud and smelly stands, he joked he might need a quick change of clothes before last night’s visit to the Queen at Balmoral.

 

SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford said he was “desperate for an election”, but it could not be until an extension to Article 50 was secured.

He said: “It’s not just about our own party interests, it’s about our collective national interests. So we are prepared to work with others to make sure we get the timing right, but the timing right on the basis of securing that extension to Article 50.”

But Mr Blackford did anticipate that an election would be successfully called “over the course of these weeks”.

Plaid Cymru’s Liz Saville Roberts added: “We have the Prime Minister on the run. Boris is broken. We have an opportunity to bring down Boris, to break Boris and to bring down Brexit.”

Speaking on his visit to Scotland yesterday, Mr Johnson once more said it defied belief the opposition had not agreed to an election to try to force out the

Government. The Tories last night revealed a list of the 35 times Mr Corbyn has publicly called for an election since 2017.

In January he said an election was the “most practical and democratic option” to break the Brexit deadlock.

And in July he demonstrated outside Parliament to “demand” a vote.

Mr Johnson said: “I think it’s a most sensational paradox that the Opposition is given the chance to have an election and have it turned down.

“Clearly there’s a contest going on to make sure we come out on October 31st. There are people in Parliament who plainly want to block that — Jeremy Corbn and the SNP. I think they’re wrong, the people want us to get on and do it.”

Labour MPs said they were desperate to make Mr Johnson “stew”.

He was also attacked again over the axing of 21 Tory moderates for voting against No Deal.

But the PM warned rebel MPs: “I will go to Brussels, I’ll get a deal and I’ll make sure we will come out on October 31.”

The PM and Carrie Symonds have arrived at Balmoral ahead of a meeting with the Queen
Abermedia / Michal Wachucik

 



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