Cat fight! Three tiger brothers splash around as they enjoy play time at Indian national park 

Three tiger brothers made quite a splash when they dived into a pool to cool off and had a cat-fight at an Indian national park.

The 11-month-old male Bengal tigers were filmed escaping from 40 degree heat at Bandhavgarh National Park, central India, by wildlife photographer Paul Goldstein as he led a guided tour.

Bengal tigers are endangered in the wild with less than 1,800 remaining, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature. 

Three tiger brothers were filmed and photographed having a cat-fight in a pool at India’s Bandhavgarh National Park

The trio chased each other around the pool and tried to grab each other's legs as they dived into the pool to escape 40 degree heat

The trio chased each other around the pool and tried to grab each other's legs as they dived into the pool to escape 40 degree heat

The trio chased each other around the pool and tried to grab each other’s legs as they dived into the pool to escape 40 degree heat

One tiger brother also chased another out of the pool in scenes recorded in adorable video

One tiger brother also chased another out of the pool in scenes recorded in adorable video

One tiger brother also chased another out of the pool in scenes recorded in adorable video

An adorable video shows the three musketeers jostling and pawing at each other as they splash around the pool.

One of the orange and black striped big cats then settles down for a watery nap before being chased out of the water by another.

The pair playfully brandish their paws, trying to grab each other’s legs, before settling down in the parched grass.

Paul, who lives in Wimbledon and leads tours with Exodus Travels, said: ‘I have waited twenty years to see a watery cat fight like this. 

‘It was such a pleasure and for half an hour these three 11 month old brothers fought. 

‘These skills are essential for hunting later in life, but I could not help thinking some of the amphibious disciplines were more indulgence.

Two of the tigers wrestle with each other in the pool at the National Park in India

Two of the tigers wrestle with each other in the pool at the National Park in India

Two of the tigers wrestle with each other in the pool at the National Park in India

One tiger prepares to paw another in the face. Bengal tigers are endangered in the wild according to the IUCN

One tiger prepares to paw another in the face. Bengal tigers are endangered in the wild according to the IUCN

One tiger prepares to paw another in the face. Bengal tigers are endangered in the wild according to the IUCN

Two of the trio wrestle each other in the pool. There are less than 1,800 of their group in the wild according to the IUCN

Two of the trio wrestle each other in the pool. There are less than 1,800 of their group in the wild according to the IUCN

Two of the trio wrestle each other in the pool. There are less than 1,800 of their group in the wild according to the IUCN

‘When you guide wildlife fans, moments like this are utter joy, the grail, and we were grinning like Cheshire cats after, whilst the three of them went off to rest – a cat nap if you like.’

The cubs are the first litter to their mother, Dotty.  

Bengal tigers population increased between 2006 and 2010, according to the IUCN, but they are still considered endangered.

The species has suffered major range reductions in India due to poaching for their prized coats and body parts, which are used in Chinese medicine, and habitat loss. 

To help save the endangered animal, Paul has raised $200,000 for Bandhavgarh National Park by climbing Kilimanjaro, and running below the Taj Mahal.

This stunning photo of one cat pawing another in the face was shot by Paul Goldstein while taking tourists around the national park with Exodus Travel

This stunning photo of one cat pawing another in the face was shot by Paul Goldstein while taking tourists around the national park with Exodus Travel

This stunning photo of one cat pawing another in the face was shot by Paul Goldstein while taking tourists around the national park with Exodus Travel

Here one of the big cats appears to have got the upper hand on its brother as they continue fighting

Here one of the big cats appears to have got the upper hand on its brother as they continue fighting

Here one of the big cats appears to have got the upper hand on its brother as they continue fighting

Paul said that he hadn't seen three big cats fighting in water for at least 20 years

Paul said that he hadn't seen three big cats fighting in water for at least 20 years

Paul said that he hadn’t seen three big cats fighting in water for at least 20 years

In a campaign called Worth More Alive, the 50-year-old also plans to run the London marathon next year to further raise awareness for tigers.  

‘A tigress like Dotty is worth far more alive than on the slab, victim of a poachers bullet’, he said. 

‘Dead, parcelled-up piecemeal, its body parts would have an illegal value of around $30,000. 

‘Alive, benefiting thousands of local people and with many ancillary benefactors, living a long and fertile life, it could be $50m.’ 

‘Scenes like this mask the human race’s disgraceful record on protecting rare and endangered animals like tigers and rhinos. 

‘The insidious demands of traditional Chinese medicine have wreaked havoc on their numbers. 

‘This is medicine with no medical provenance and utterly unnecessary, so when you find strongholds like Bandhavgarh rather than grisly Chinese holding facilities it gives you some hope.’ 

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