Creepy moment a massive black spider emerges and bares its bright green venomous fangs

In a clip almost guaranteed to make the viewer shudder, an enormous black spider is captured emerging from a hole in the wall after it was lured out with a kebab stick.

Chris Brown, who works in Wiltshire, noticed silk threads belonging to a spider’s web were surrounding an opening in the mortar outside his office on September 14. 

The clip shows Brown gently tapping on the silken threads with the stick.

All is quiet for a few moments and then the spider’s legs sinisterly emerge from the opening 

The spider, which has been identified as a tube web spider or Segestria Florentina, is the biggest tube-dwelling spider in Europe.

Lured out from its lair by the stick, the giant creepy crawly wraps its legs around the stick. 

The clip shows Brown tapping on the threads with the stick

The clip shows Brown tapping on the threads with the stick

The spider starts to emerge from the opening

The spider starts to emerge from the opening

 The clip shows Brown tapping on the threads with the stick. The enormous spider starts to emerge from the opening

As the stick is pulled away, the tube web spider bares its bright green fangs before retreating back down into the hole.  

‘When I was a kid I used to lure spiders out their nests with sticks, I thought I’d try it again and then I found it,’ Brown said.   

There were about four other spiders inside the hole, he added.   

Tube web spiders are one of the largest types in the UK – and their bite is like a bee sting. It can also be called a cellar spider.

The spider is lured out and wraps its legs around the stick

The spider is lured out and wraps its legs around the stick

It goes on to bare its terrifying fluorescent green fangs

It goes on to bare its terrifying fluorescent green fangs

The spider is lured out and wraps its legs around the stick before baring its terrifying bright green fangs

Their thick black bodies range from between 0.5 inches to v wide, their fangs shine menacingly green and they are known to eat their own mothers.  

Originally from southern Europe, adults are generally found from June to November and create a tube-shaped web with trip-lines radiating out. 

The spiders are one of the largest in Europe and are nocturnal hunters that prey on cockroaches, moths, bees and wasps.

The tube web spider's thick black bodies range from between 0.5 inches to 0.9 inches wide, their fangs shine menacingly green (see above) and they are known to eat their own mothers

The tube web spider's thick black bodies range from between 0.5 inches to 0.9 inches wide, their fangs shine menacingly green (see above) and they are known to eat their own mothers

The tube web spider’s thick black bodies range from between 0.5 inches to 0.9 inches wide, their fangs shine menacingly green (see above) and they are known to eat their own mothers

The tube web spider or Segestria Florentina (pictured) is the biggest tube-dwelling spider in Europe. They sow distinctive tube-shaped webs in cracks and holes and wait by the entrance for prey to touch the strands

The tube web spider or Segestria Florentina (pictured) is the biggest tube-dwelling spider in Europe. They sow distinctive tube-shaped webs in cracks and holes and wait by the entrance for prey to touch the strands

The tube web spider or Segestria Florentina (pictured) is the biggest tube-dwelling spider in Europe. They sow distinctive tube-shaped webs in cracks and holes and wait by the entrance for prey to touch the strands

They sow distinctive tube-shaped webs in cracks and holes and wait by the entrance for prey to touch the strands.

They first entered the UK 150 years ago, from continental Europe, arriving on ships docking in ports. 

The females tend to be larger than males and can reach a body length of up to nearly one inch.

This spider’s appearance in Wiltshire comes after a record number of spiders have been found in British homes, following this year’s warm and wet summer, according to scientists.

Scientists at the University of Gloucester have found more spider posts on social media than they did this time last year

Scientists at the University of Gloucester have found more spider posts on social media than they did this time last year

Scientists at the University of Gloucester have found more spider posts on social media than they did this time last year

The weather has created a fertile breeding ground for the types of insects spiders like to eat.  

As a result, people appear to be finding more eight-legged creatures in their homes than usual, according to scientists at the University of Gloucester. 

The group of entomologists have found more spider posts on social media than they did this time last year.

There are 650 types of spiders in the UK, including 12 that are harmful to humans.       

Segestria Florentina/Tube Web Spider

Segestria florentina/Tube web spider is the largest European spider found and the bodies of females can reach lengths of just under an inch.

They first entered the UK 150 years ago, from continental Europe, arriving on ships docking in ports. 

The spiders are one of the largest in Europe and are nocturnal hunters that prey on cockroaches, moths, bees and wasps.

Adults are generally found from June to November and create a tube-shaped web with trip-lines radiating out. 

They have a black or dark brown body, often with a green shine on their fangs.

They are known to eat their own mothers 

While their bite has no long lasting effects, it is described as feeling similar to a bee sting. 

They are also known as a tube web spider or cellar spider because they create a web in a crack or gap and wait for prey to step into it.    

 

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