Dad’s Army remake WILL include anti-German jokes

THE Dad’s Army remake will include anti-German jokes.

Three episodes of the classic sitcom will be remade for Gold for broadcast this summer and it has now been reported that the anti-German jokes will remain in the show.

The remake will include anti-German jokes

A UKTV spokesman told The Daily Star: “Our stance is not to edit great comedies of the past if we can avoid it.

“And in this case the scripts reflect the mood of the country at that time in history and are based on experiences of the writers including Jimmy Perry’s service in the Home Guard during the Second World War.”

It comes after the creator of ITV drama Victoria says the BBC should stop airing episodes of Dad’s Army because it makes them look pro-Brexit.

Daisy Goodwin insists the classic sitcom, which is still watched by millions every Saturday, should be “retired.”

Dad's Army was first broadcast on the BBC 50 years ago
BBC

Dad’s Army was first broadcast on the BBC 50 years ago[/caption]

Daisy Goodwin has called for Dad's Army to be 'retired' from the BBC
PA:Press Association

Daisy Goodwin has called for Dad’s Army to be ‘retired’ from the BBC[/caption]

Writing in the Radio Times, she said: “If you really want to nail the BBC for influencing the nation’s state of mind about Brexit, you might look at how often Dad’s Army has been shown.

“That plucky little arrow from the title sequence being pushed back across the Channel by the three swastikas seems to have inspired the Brexit Party’s own logo.

“The world of Dad’s Army is a comforting place; it was reassuring during the mayhem of the three-day week and it’s soothing to those of us who worry about the effects of a no-deal Brexit.

“Our current difficulties will not be resolved with a comic flourish.

Many have even suggested that the opening sequence from the show inspired the Brexit Party’s own logo
Many have even suggested that the opening sequence from the show inspired the Brexit Party’s own logo
The Royal Mail released these stamps on the same day that MPs first voted on the EU withdrawal bill
The Royal Mail released these stamps on the same day that MPs first voted on the EU withdrawal bill

“The BBC, if it wants to maintain its claim to impartiality, needs to retire the Home Guard (or send them on leave), because in the words of Private Frazer, ‘We are all doomed!’”

The BBC comedy, starring Arthur Lowe, John Le Mesurier and Clive Dunn, focused on the antics of a dysfunctional unit of the Home Guard during World War Two.

With the threat of a German invasion looming, the defence of Walmington-on-Sea rests in the hands of the local bank manager and a motley collection of volunteers.

Despite being woefully ill-equipped, the rag-tag crew is ready to take on invading troops from across the Channel.

The Home Guard was made up of men ineligible for military service – largely because they were considered too old, hence the name “Dad’s Army”.

The show first aired on July 31, 1968 and ended on November 13, 1977.

Many of the 80 episodes are frequently repeated.

Clive Dunn, John Laurie, Arthur Lowe and John Le Mesurier starred in the original Dad’s Army
Kobal Collection – Shutterstock

Miss Goodwin said Dad’s Army is firmly “embedded in this country’s imagination”.

But she argued that the whole nation needs to be reminded that “we are not living in Walmington-on-Sea”.

This is not the first time Dad’s Army has been embroiled in the debate surrounding Brexit.

Last year, the Royal Mail released a run of stamps commemorating the show for its 50th anniversary.

The stamps, which featured the show’s most popular characters and their catchphrases, were unveiled on the same day as MPs first voted on the EU withdrawal bill.

One included Private Frazer’s famous quote: “We’re doomed. Doomed!”

Another featured Sergeant Wilson asking: “Do you think that’s wise, sir?”


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