David Beckham is digitally aged to look 70 in new Malaria prevention campaign

David Beckham has been digitally aged to look 70-years-old in a  haunting new campaign calling for action against Malaria.

The former professional footballer, 45, was unrecognisable as he was given greying locks, age spots and wrinkles in the Malaria Must Die, So Millions Can Live campaign on Wednesday, which sees him travel to the future to witness the end of the disease.

Showing a before-and-after shot of the digital ageing process, the clip presented David in an imagined future where Malaria had been wiped out as he declared that ‘our world has changed’ as a result.  

Changes: David Beckham was digitally aged to look 70-years-old as he calls for action to help prevent deaths caused by Malaria in a campaign video released on Wednesday

Changes: David Beckham was digitally aged to look 70-years-old as he calls for action to help prevent deaths caused by Malaria in a campaign video released on Wednesday

After: The former professional footballer, 45, had been given greying locks, age spots and wrinkles in the Malaria Must Die, So Millions Can Live campaign

After: The former professional footballer, 45, had been given greying locks, age spots and wrinkles in the Malaria Must Die, So Millions Can Live campaign

Changes: David Beckham was digitally aged to look 70-years-old as he calls for action to help prevent deaths caused by Malaria in a new campaign released on Wednesday

As well as being aged up, David’s tattoos appeared faded as he faced himself in a side-by-side shot for the video campaign.

David said of the charity: ‘The fight against malaria is a cause close to my heart because the disease remains a huge killer of children and we have the opportunity to change that in our lifetime.

‘I’ve worked with Malaria No More UK since 2009, supporting campaigns and helping shine a light on the challenge.

‘Their campaigns always use great creativity and innovation to attract attention to the issue and I’m delighted also to have met some of the inspiring people who are working so hard to end this disease.’

Aged-up: As well as being aged up, David's tattoos appeared faded as he faced himself in a side-by-side shot for the video campaign

Aged-up: As well as being aged up, David's tattoos appeared faded as he faced himself in a side-by-side shot for the video campaign

Aged-up: As well as being aged up, David’s tattoos appeared faded as he faced himself in a side-by-side shot for the video campaign

Call to action: David said, 'The fight against malaria is a cause close to my heart because the disease remains a huge killer of children and we have the opportunity to change that'

Call to action: David said, 'The fight against malaria is a cause close to my heart because the disease remains a huge killer of children and we have the opportunity to change that'

Call to action: David said, ‘The fight against malaria is a cause close to my heart because the disease remains a huge killer of children and we have the opportunity to change that’

 The campaign video also showed David posing in a green room as he was in the process of being digitally aged up.

Malaria is a life-threatening tropical disease spread by mosquitoes. 

It is one of the world’s biggest killers, claiming the life of a child every two minutes, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

Most of these deaths occur in Africa, where 250,000 youngsters die from the disease every year. 

Good cause: David is a founding member of Malaria No More UK's leadership council, which also runs the campaign (pictured in a promotional shot for the charity)

Good cause: David is a founding member of Malaria No More UK's leadership council, which also runs the campaign (pictured in a promotional shot for the charity)

Good cause: David is a founding member of Malaria No More UK’s leadership council, which also runs the campaign (pictured in a promotional shot for the charity)

Malaria is caused by a parasite called Plasmodium, of which five cause malaria.

The Plasmodium parasite is mainly spread by female Anopheles mosquitoes.

When an infected mosquito bites a person, the parasite enters their bloodstream. 

David is a founding member of Malaria No More UK’s leadership council, which also runs the campaign.

Speaking about the campaign, Dr Pedro Alonso, director of the World Health Organisation’s global malaria programme, said: ‘The emergence of Covid-19 has shown the world how critical our health systems are.

‘It is crucial that 2021 sees the world getting back on track towards achieving existing targets to reduce malaria as we come through the pandemic.

‘By investing in ending malaria, we will not only save lives that would otherwise be lost to this deadly disease; we will also protect current health systems from the double burden of malaria and other diseases like Covid-19.’

David isn’t the only famous face to work with Malaria Must Die, So Millions Can Live campaigns, as Hugh Laurie, Emeli Sande and Peter Capaldi have also starred in past clips. 

David first got involved with the cause at the launch of Malaria No More more than a decade ago, when he played tennis at Wembley Stadium over the world’s longest mosquito net with Andy Murray. 

Good cause: On Monday, David and his wife Victoria took part in a video for Elton John's AIDS Foundation on World Aids Day

Good cause: On Monday, David and his wife Victoria took part in a video for Elton John's AIDS Foundation on World Aids Day

Good cause: On Monday, David and his wife Victoria took part in a video for Elton John’s AIDS Foundation on World Aids Day

WHAT IS MALARIA? 

Malaria is a life-threatening tropical disease spread by mosquitoes. 

It is one of the world’s biggest killers, claiming the life of a child every two minutes, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

Most of these deaths occur in Africa, where 250,000 youngsters die from the disease every year. 

Malaria is caused by a parasite called Plasmodium, of which five cause malaria.

The Plasmodium parasite is mainly spread by female Anopheles mosquitoes.

When an infected mosquito bites a person, the parasite enters their bloodstream. 

Symptoms include:

  • Fever
  • Feeling hot and shivery
  • Headaches
  • Vomiting 
  • Muscle pain
  • Diarrhoea

These usually appear between a week and 18 days of infection, but can taken up to a year or occasionally even more.

People should seek medical attention immediately if they develop symptoms during or after visiting a malaria-affected area.

Malaria is found in more than 100 countries, including:

  • Large areas of Africa and Asia
  • Central and South America
  • Haiti and the Dominican Republic
  • Parts of the Middle East
  • Some Pacific Islands 

A blood test confirms a diagnosis. 

In very rare cases, malaria can be spread via blood transfusions. 

For the most part, malaria can be avoided by using insect repellent, wearing clothes that cover your limbs and using an insecticide-treated mosquito net. 

Malaria prevention tablets are also often recommended. 

Treatment, which involves anti-malaria medication, usually leads to a full recovery if done early enough.

Untreated, the infection can result in severe anaemia. This occurs when the parasites enter red blood cells, which then rupture and reduce the number of the cells overall.

And cerebral malaria can occur when the small blood vessels in the brain become blocked, leading to seizures, brain damage and even coma. 

Source: NHS Choices 

 

Advertisement

link

(Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply