Doctor saves the life of his fellow hockey player who collapsed after suffering a cardiac arrest

A doctor is being lauded for reacting swiftly and saving the life of a fellow adult league hockey player who collapsed during a game after suffering a cardiac arrest.

Jib Street, a native of Canada, was skating with his team last month at the Pineville Ice House in Charlotte, North Carolina, when the ice rink’s camera caught him collapsing in front of the goalie, according to FOX 46

Dr. Craig Bryant and others at the rink immediately reacted as the man lying on the ice lacked a pulse for more than five minutes.

‘When I did see the video a couple of days ago, it is difficult to watch yourself go down and lie motionless on the ice,’ Street told FOX 46 as the pair were reunited.

‘The gratitude comes from how fast this guy responded– that’s the miracle. I’m skating with an emergency room doctor.’

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Jib Street, wearing number 81, was skating in front of the goal when he collapsed at the Pineville Ice House in Charlotte, North Carolina

Jib Street, wearing number 81, was skating in front of the goal when he collapsed at the Pineville Ice House in Charlotte, North Carolina

Jib Street, wearing number 81, was skating in front of the goal when he collapsed at the Pineville Ice House in Charlotte, North Carolina

The rink cameras caught Street dropping to the ice as he went into cardiac arrest 

The rink cameras caught Street dropping to the ice as he went into cardiac arrest 

The rink cameras caught Street dropping to the ice as he went into cardiac arrest 

Bryant can be seen on the rink video dashing across the ice, the second man to reach Street. As the men shout for someone to call 911, the doctor performed CPR. 

‘It took a village there were so many guys that were involved,’ the humble physician told the news station. ‘Whether it was this guy that guy, the guys did what they could do. Everyone has expressed their concern and excitement that you’re doing well.’

‘This is definitely, you know, a situation where bystander CPR and AED availability are definitely put into use, and look it how effective its been,’ Bryant added about the AED defibrillator unit that also helped preserve Street’s life.

Street would go on to make a full-recovery thanks to the swift actions and team effort of Dr. Bryant and his fellow hockey players.

Dr. Craig Bryant and Jib Street reunite at the rink to share their story

Dr. Craig Bryant and Jib Street reunite at the rink to share their story

Dr. Craig Bryant and Jib Street reunite at the rink to share their story

Dr. Craig Bryant in the lower left raced across the ice after Street fell to the ice

Dr. Craig Bryant in the lower left raced across the ice after Street fell to the ice

Dr. Craig Bryant in the lower left raced across the ice after Street fell to the ice

As Street remained motionless, Dr. Bryant began to perform CPR while a call was put out to grab the rink's portable defibrillator

As Street remained motionless, Dr. Bryant began to perform CPR while a call was put out to grab the rink's portable defibrillator

As Street remained motionless, Dr. Bryant began to perform CPR while a call was put out to grab the rink’s portable defibrillator

To thank his ‘guardian angel,’ the lucky hockey fanatic presented the doctor with a special gift — an Edmonton Oilers jersey autographed by ‘The Great One’ Wayne Gretzky.

‘I want to share my prized possession with you to say thank you for saving my life,’ Street told Bryant during their reunion.

‘Oh my gosh, look at this. That is amazing. Signed by Wayne Gretzky,’ Bryant responded, holding up the hockey artifact. ‘I love you, man. Thank you so much.’ 

Dr. Bryant displayed Street’s gift from one hockey player to another for saving his life

Jib Street hugs his rescuer Dr. Craig Bryant after reuniting at the Pineville Ice House

Jib Street hugs his rescuer Dr. Craig Bryant after reuniting at the Pineville Ice House

Jib Street hugs his rescuer Dr. Craig Bryant after reuniting at the Pineville Ice House

HOW TO GIVE CPR 

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can be used to try to restart someone’s heart if it has stopped.

CPR should only be used in an emergency situation if someone is unconscious and not breathing.

People without CPR training should stick to hands-only chest compressions, the NHS says.

To carry out a chest compression:

Place the heel of your hand on the breastbone at the centre of the person’s chest. Place your other hand on top of your first hand and interlock your fingers.

Position yourself with your shoulders above your hands.

Using your body weight (not just your arms), press straight down by 5-6cm (2-2.5 inches) on their chest.

Keeping your hands on their chest, release the compression and allow the chest to return to its original position.

Repeat these compressions at a rate of 100 to 120 times per minute until an ambulance arrives or you become exhausted. 

Source: NHS 

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