Drinking coffee does NOT increase your chance of getting cancer, study finds

Caffeine addicts can rest easy as your morning coffee does not increase your chance of getting cancer, a new study has found.

The health benefits or risks associated with drinking a coffee a day have long been debated worldwide.

But now, Queensland scientists claim they have conclusive evidence that there is no link between caffeine and cancer.

Caffeine addicts can rest easy as your morning does not increase your chance of getting cancer, a new study has found (stock image)

Caffeine addicts can rest easy as your morning does not increase your chance of getting cancer, a new study has found (stock image)

Caffeine addicts can rest easy as your morning does not increase your chance of getting cancer, a new study has found (stock image)

The study, by QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, looked at genetic data from more than 300,000 coffee drinkers, which gave a more robust indication of whether altering coffee consumption would change the risk of cancer, Associate Professor Stuart MacGregor told the ABC.

Association between coffee consumption and its risk: 

The relationship between coffee intake and individual cancer risks was found to have no link

Most cancers showed little or no associations with coffee 

Taken together, coffee intake is not associated with overall risk of being diagnosed with or dying from cancer 

Source: International Journal of Epidemiology 

Previous studies, which were done on a much smaller scale, had conflicting findings. 

‘What we found was that irrespective of specific compounds that were there, in terms of the relationship between the coffee they drink every day and whether they ultimately get cancer, we found that essentially there is no link,’ Mr MacGregor said.

‘Genetics don’t lie. For other diseases, the jury’s still out — we need to do more work.’

He told the Brisbane Times that while the study may have seemed trivial to the average person, the possible link was worth investigating.

‘There are genes for whether you have a taste for tea or coffee, there are genes which govern how your body processes caffeine.

Queensland scientists claim they have conclusive evidence that there is no link between caffeine and cancer

Queensland scientists claim they have conclusive evidence that there is no link between caffeine and cancer

Queensland scientists claim they have conclusive evidence that there is no link between caffeine and cancer

‘So there are genes for cancer and genes for coffee consumption, and you need to triangulate whether there’s any association.’

He said the study gave them confidence that there were no detrimental effects from people popping the kettle on each morning.

The study, which was funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council, will be published in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

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