Duchess plans to turn her Sussex Royal brand into a global empire

Meghan Markle has trademarked her Sussex royal brand on more than 100 items, from teaching materials and emotional support groups to clothing and even newspapers, it can be revealed today.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex, who are currently enjoying a six-week Christmas break in Canada, appear intent on turning their brand into a global empire as they stamp their name on the list of good and services.

The move has seen the royal submit trademark applications on dozens of products including T-shirts, social services and more surprisingly newspapers for their newly created foundation Sussex Royal.

It comes after the royal pair have struggled through a tumultuous year in which they have been criticised for their ‘hypocritical’ preaching on environmental issues despite travelling the globe on private jets, and planning to ‘modernise’ the Royal family.  

Meghan Markle's plans to expand her Sussex royal empire has seen her trademark the title on an array of products and services

Meghan Markle's plans to expand her Sussex royal empire has seen her trademark the title on an array of products and services

Meghan Markle’s plans to expand her Sussex royal empire has seen her trademark the title on an array of products and services

Documents published by the Intellectual Property Office have now shown how the the Duke and Duchess of Sussex plan to expand their brand

Documents published by the Intellectual Property Office have now shown how the the Duke and Duchess of Sussex plan to expand their brand

 Documents published by the Intellectual Property Office have now shown how the the Duke and Duchess of Sussex plan to expand their brand

The royals have submitted a number of trademark applications for products including T-shirts, social services and head gear

The royals have submitted a number of trademark applications for products including T-shirts, social services and head gear

The royals have submitted a number of trademark applications for products including T-shirts, social services and head gear

Documents published by the Intellectual Property Office disclose that among the items the royals have so far trademarked are instructional and teaching materials; printed educational materials; printed publications; educational books; textbooks; magazines and newsletters. 

Also on the list are clothing; footwear; headgear; t-shirts; coats; jackets; anoraks; trousers; sweaters; jerseys; dresses; pyjamas; suits; sweat shirts; hooded tops; caps; hats; bandanas; headbands; socks; scarves and neckwear; gloves; sportswear.

The list also shows the royal pair have hopes to trademark the title on developing and coordinating volunteer projects for charitable purposes; providing volunteering opportunities and recruitment of volunteers and information, advisory and consultancy services. 

While some of the items align with what the royal pair continue to promote, others appear to indicate that former actress Meghan and Harry truly are intent on ‘changing the world’, as their admirer Kim Kardashian once said. 

Speaking at the Armenia Technology Convention in Yerevan this year, the famous Kardashian said: ‘I still love and value the fact they bring such attention to such important movements that need to happen and things that they’re really passionate about.

‘They’re still changing the world.’

The most intriguing of all is the application to trademark ‘magazines, newspapers, newsletters [and] periodicals’.

The list also revealed the pair have submitted trademarks in periodicals; printed reports; fact sheets; brochures; programmes; booklets; pamphlets; leaflets; manuals; journals; diaries; calendars; posters; art prints; notebooks; postcards and greeting cards.    

Also on the list of items are footwear; coats; jackets; anoraks; trousers; sweaters; jerseys; dresses; pyjamas; suits; sweat shirts; hooded tops; caps; hats; bandanas; headbands; socks; scarves and neckwear; gloves and sportswear

Also on the list of items are footwear; coats; jackets; anoraks; trousers; sweaters; jerseys; dresses; pyjamas; suits; sweat shirts; hooded tops; caps; hats; bandanas; headbands; socks; scarves and neckwear; gloves and sportswear

Also on the list of items are footwear; coats; jackets; anoraks; trousers; sweaters; jerseys; dresses; pyjamas; suits; sweat shirts; hooded tops; caps; hats; bandanas; headbands; socks; scarves and neckwear; gloves and sportswear

The list features more than 100 items, from teaching materials and emotional support groups to clothing and even newspapers

The list features more than 100 items, from teaching materials and emotional support groups to clothing and even newspapers

The list features more than 100 items, from teaching materials and emotional support groups to clothing and even newspapers

In October a source told the American news network CNN that the royal couple were single-handedly’ modernising the monarchy. 

The move to expand their empire comes after Harry and Meghan officially parted ways with the decade-old charity The Royal Foundation, which was set up by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge in 2009, to pursue their own charitable project. 

The new venture also comes as  the royals spend Christmas 5,000 miles away from the rest of the Royal Family at Sandringham in Vancouver, Canada, with seven-month-old son Archie and the Duchess’s mother, Doria Ragland.

A black and white picture shared by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex showed the pair laughing as they posed in front of a Christmas tree, with Archie. 

The move comes after Prince Harry and Meghan were urged by Royal family members to return from abroad to spend Christmas in the UK, as Prince Philip spends a fourth night in hospital.

The couple missed the Queen’s traditional pre-Christmas lunch at Buckingham Palace at the monarch’s private Sandringham estate on Christmas Day.  

Earlier this year, Meghan became the first person to guest-edit British Vogue, and in its September issue explained in her editorial how she and Vogue’s editor, Edward Enninful, ‘teased through how one can shine light in a world filled with seemingly daily darkness’. 

Earlier this month an enchanting family photo show]ed the Duke and Duchess of Sussex laughing as they pose in front of a Christmas tree, with Archie

Earlier this month an enchanting family photo show]ed the Duke and Duchess of Sussex laughing as they pose in front of a Christmas tree, with Archie

Earlier this month an enchanting family photo show]ed the Duke and Duchess of Sussex laughing as they pose in front of a Christmas tree, with Archie

However she and Harry were met with criticism after they chose to deviate from royal protocol and talk about their struggles in the limelight during the ITV documentary, Harry & Meghan: An African Journey. 

During the show, the pair were faced with claims that they had drifted away from Prince William and Kate Middleton after Harry told journalist Tom Bradbury: ‘We are certainly on different paths at the moment but I will always be there for him as I know he will always be there for me.

‘We don’t see each other as much as we used to because we are so busy but I love him dearly.

‘The majority of the stuff is created out of nothing but as brothers, you know, you have good days, you have bad days.’

Meghan discussed her struggles in the spotlight during the ITV documentary, Harry & Meghan: An African Journey

Meghan discussed her struggles in the spotlight during the ITV documentary, Harry & Meghan: An African Journey

Meghan discussed her struggles in the spotlight during the ITV documentary, Harry & Meghan: An African Journey

During the show, Harry told journalist Tom Bradbury that he and Prince William did not see each other as often as they once used to

During the show, Harry told journalist Tom Bradbury that he and Prince William did not see each other as often as they once used to

 During the show, Harry told journalist Tom Bradbury that he and Prince William did not see each other as often as they once used to

Princess Anne blasts health and safety culture as she warns excessive rules are hindering children’s decision-making

By Dora Allday for The Daily Mail

Health and safety culture is doing children more harm than good, Princess Anne said today.

Princess Anne, Princess Royal attends the Christmas Day Church service at Church of St Mary Magdalene on the Sandringham estate

Princess Anne, Princess Royal attends the Christmas Day Church service at Church of St Mary Magdalene on the Sandringham estate

Princess Anne, Princess Royal attends the Christmas Day Church service at Church of St Mary Magdalene on the Sandringham estate

She blasted excessive rules and regulations for hindering youngsters’ decision-making, particularly in ‘risky’ sports.

The famously outspoken royal admitted that as the Scottish Rugby Union’s patron she protested against extra padding being sewn into players’ shirts.

‘I did say to Scottish rugby’s doctor, please don’t do that because it’ll only make them hit each other harder,’ she told The Daily Telegraph.

‘One of the things that all sports have to come to terms with is the risk element,’ she added.

An avid equestrian herself, the Princess Royal was hospitalised in 1964 aged 14 when she hurt her hand falling off her horse.

Now, aged 69, she expressed surprise that helmets are not compulsory after visiting a skate park in Corby.

‘I thought that was interesting because it makes it their responsibility,’ she said.

‘If you don’t allow children to assess their own risk-taking abilities, they never really learn, so they then go off and do things, which inherently they’re not good enough to do, but somebody has said health and safety has said this is OK, and they’ve got no way of judging on their own whether or not they’ve got the skills to do it.’

The Princess Royal was hospitalised in 1964 aged 14 when she hurt her hand falling off her horse but would not give up her passion. Here she races at the Royal Ascot 1972

The Princess Royal was hospitalised in 1964 aged 14 when she hurt her hand falling off her horse but would not give up her passion. Here she races at the Royal Ascot 1972

The Princess Royal was hospitalised in 1964 aged 14 when she hurt her hand falling off her horse but would not give up her passion. Here she races at the Royal Ascot 1972

Here princess Anne can be seen falling from her horse after a jump at the Rushall Horse Trials in Wiltshire in April 1975

Here princess Anne can be seen falling from her horse after a jump at the Rushall Horse Trials in Wiltshire in April 1975

Here princess Anne can be seen falling from her horse after a jump at the Rushall Horse Trials in Wiltshire in April 1975

Here princess Anne can be seen falling from her horse after a jump at the Rushall Horse Trials in Wiltshire in April 1975

Here princess Anne can be seen falling from her horse after a jump at the Rushall Horse Trials in Wiltshire in April 1975 

During the interview, in support of the children’s rugby charity Wooden Spoon, for which she is patron, the princess also urged charities to step back from a total focus on arts projects.

She said: ‘In all big cities you tend to get areas which focus more on arts and crafts and theatre – but that doesn’t apply to everybody.

‘It’s just the way – like Tetbury is full of antiques shops.

‘Why do you all want to be there? It’s a mystery to me.

‘But it doesn’t mean to say that everybody who comes from Tetbury is an antiques dealer.’

Britain's Prince George of Cambridge, Britain's Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Britain's Princess Charlotte of Cambridge, Britain's Princess Anne, Princess Royal, and Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, leave after the Royal Family's traditional Christmas Day service at St Mary Magdalene Church in Sandringham, Norfolk, eastern England

Britain's Prince George of Cambridge, Britain's Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Britain's Princess Charlotte of Cambridge, Britain's Princess Anne, Princess Royal, and Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, leave after the Royal Family's traditional Christmas Day service at St Mary Magdalene Church in Sandringham, Norfolk, eastern England

Britain’s Prince George of Cambridge, Britain’s Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Britain’s Princess Charlotte of Cambridge, Britain’s Princess Anne, Princess Royal, and Britain’s Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, leave after the Royal Family’s traditional Christmas Day service at St Mary Magdalene Church in Sandringham, Norfolk, eastern England

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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