High air pressure set to black out TV shows including Greatest Dancer

Millions of people across the country face missing radio TV shows such as the Greatest Dancer this weekend as record high air pressure scrambles signals. 

Viewers could instead see blank or pixelated screens instead of the BBC dancing show, which is set to air on BBC One on Saturday evening. 

Alongside freezing temperatures as low as -6 this morning, forecasters predicted air pressure as high as 1050 millibars, close to the all-time record of 1053 millibars, which was set in 1902.

Viewers could instead see blank or pixelated screens instead of the BBC dancing show, which is set to air on BBC One on Saturday evening

Viewers could instead see blank or pixelated screens instead of the BBC dancing show, which is set to air on BBC One on Saturday evening

Viewers could instead see blank or pixelated screens instead of the BBC dancing show, which is set to air on BBC One on Saturday evening

It was chilly start on Saturday morning, with temperatures reaching as low as -6 in Wales and -4 elsewhere

It was chilly start on Saturday morning, with temperatures reaching as low as -6 in Wales and -4 elsewhere

It was chilly start on Saturday morning, with temperatures reaching as low as -6 in Wales and -4 elsewhere

TV and radio signals could be affected as they reflect off a warm layer of air which is circulating above cold air at ground level. 

Last month, viewers in many areas were left with poor signals or no picture at all as air pressure hit 1035 millibars.

Freeview, which provides TV channels to around 40million people across the UK, said: ‘High pressure can mean some viewers experience pixelated pictures or a temporary loss of certain channels.

‘We’ll closely monitor the weather on Sunday and update our service status.’ 

And the viewers faced a chilly start to the weekend, as freezing temperatures prompted a widespread frost.

Millions of people across the country face missing radio TV shows such as the Greatest Dancer this weekend as record high air temperatures scramble signals

Millions of people across the country face missing radio TV shows such as the Greatest Dancer this weekend as record high air temperatures scramble signals

Millions of people across the country face missing radio TV shows such as the Greatest Dancer this weekend as record high air temperatures scramble signals

Alongside freezing temperatures as low as -6 this morning, forecasters have predicted air pressure as high as 1050 millibars, close to the all-time record of 1053 millibars, which was set in 1902

Alongside freezing temperatures as low as -6 this morning, forecasters have predicted air pressure as high as 1050 millibars, close to the all-time record of 1053 millibars, which was set in 1902

Alongside freezing temperatures as low as -6 this morning, forecasters have predicted air pressure as high as 1050 millibars, close to the all-time record of 1053 millibars, which was set in 1902

TV and radio signals could be affected as they reflect off a warm layer of air which is circulating above cold air at ground level

TV and radio signals could be affected as they reflect off a warm layer of air which is circulating above cold air at ground level

TV and radio signals could be affected as they reflect off a warm layer of air which is circulating above cold air at ground level

There are also set to be strong winds and showers in Northern and Western Scotland, although blue skies are expected in most of England wales.  

Forecaster Aidan McGivern said: ‘We start off the weekend with a strong wind and frequent showers for the far north and west of Scotland. These showers falling as snow over the hills.

‘Perhaps some sleet at lower levels. One or two showers into the coast of Northern Ireland but otherwise it’s mostly sunny.

‘For the rest of Scotland, much of England and Wales, blue skies reach us as we start off Saturday. Temperatures are at or above freezing in most locations.

‘But its a frosty one for South Western areas and Northern Ireland. And then into Saturday itself, not much cloud to talk about.’

Temperatures are expected to climb up to between 42.8F (6C) and 46.4F (8C), but will plummet again overnight and into Sunday, reaching lows of 24.8F (-4) and 21.2F (-6) in parts of Wales.

This morning, there were frosty scenes across the country 

And speaking of the high pressure, Mr McGivern said: ‘The high pressure is going to be particularly high. It’s going to build through Saturday and Sunday and by the end of Sunday well it will be highest pressure for many years potentially across the UK.

A motorist drives through a foggy frosty valley near Builth Wells in Powys, Wales, after the cold spell overnight

A motorist drives through a foggy frosty valley near Builth Wells in Powys, Wales, after the cold spell overnight

A motorist drives through a foggy frosty valley near Builth Wells in Powys, Wales, after the cold spell overnight

The chilly temperatures are being joined by a record bout of high pressure which could affect TV and radio signals. Pictured above: Shepton Mallet, Somerset

The chilly temperatures are being joined by a record bout of high pressure which could affect TV and radio signals. Pictured above: Shepton Mallet, Somerset

The chilly temperatures are being joined by a record bout of high pressure which could affect TV and radio signals. Pictured above: Shepton Mallet, Somerset

Experts said that the higher the air pressure, the worse TV signals are.  

YouView’s TV is also set to be hit, as will its broadcast partnerships to TV services from BT, TalkTalk and Plusnet. But satellite broadcasters Sky and Freesat will not be affected as they use different frequencies. 

Online streaming should work as normal. 

MeteoGroup forecaster Mario Cuellar said: ‘The stronger the air pressure, the greater the impact on TV and radio waves. 

‘And the UK could break its 1053.6 millibars pressure record. 

‘High pressure will cause cold air at ground level and warm air above, which will act like a mirror reflecting and disrupting TV and radio waves.’ 

Met Office forecaster Marco Petagna said: ‘High pressure could well affect Freeview, causing signals to weaken and interfere with one another, due to a temperature inversion. 

‘Incredible high pressure around 1050 millibars will be over us.’  

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