Jeremy Kyle guest says ITV producers ‘decided he was a bad person’

Former participants on the Jeremy Kyle show have today opened up about the abuse they received in the wake of the programme and the lack of aftercare given by producers.

Dwayne Davison and Robert Gregory revealed they were subjected to taunts in the street and lost jobs after they appeared on the Jeremy Kyle Show before it was dramatically axed earlier this year.

The men were offering evidence to the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee in Westminster about their treatment on the ITV programme. 

Mr Davison, who had at one point, been branded the ‘most-hated’ guest of the show, today stated that he contemplated suicide after the ITV show gave him just one minute of aftercare after being ‘crucified’ on air by the host. 

Former Jeremy Kyle Show guest Robert Gregory said he had been accused during an episode of abandoning his son, although he had no knowledge of the boy.

Dwayne Davison (pictured above) appeared on the Jeremy Kyle show to talk about his relationship

Dwayne Davison (pictured above) appeared on the Jeremy Kyle show to talk about his relationship

Dwayne Davison (pictured above) appeared on the Jeremy Kyle show to talk about his relationship

He said he was vilified on the show for his alleged abandonment, despite telling producers the facts about his personal past.

He said: ‘They crucified me. They absolutely ripped me apart. I said, you’ve obviously decided I am a bad person. There is no aftercare, it doesn’t exist.’

Jeremy Kyle participant says show ruined his life 

Dwayne Davison said he was recognised in the street, received abuse and had been ‘sacked from multiple jobs’ after appearing on the show. 

He told MPs: ‘They gave me my taxi fare home and that was it – it took about 20 minutes bearing in mind I’d been in the studio for 10 hours.

‘You are locked in the smallest tiniest room you’d ever seen, all day, with no television.

‘You only see Jeremy Kyle when he’s ripping into you on the stage, when he’s making money from you.

‘My aftercare was a one minute phone call telling me when the show is going to be on.’

‘A gang of lads came up to me in the street [threatening me] I put up with this stuff all the time.

‘I did not understand what I was signing up for. I did not realise I would be the most hated man on the internet.

‘Groups of people contact me on Facebook, they’re very threatening, took a picture from Google earth outside my house. I’ve got so many people telling me they’re going to kill me, rape my girlfriend. Real sick stuff from groups of people.

‘If I’d known I never would have gone on that show.

‘They simply don’t care. I blame it on ITV. I don’t blame it on Jeremy Kyle.

‘I got tricked into going on the show a second time. I came out onto the stage and it was a warzone. He was referring to my partner as ‘it’.

‘200 people were crying with laughter. He was swearing at me. I didn’t want to say a bad word so they could edit it and make me look like a bad guy.

‘He [Kyle] was calling me a f*****g d******d.’

Dwayne Davison, who appeared on The Jeremy Kyle Show and became known as the ‘most-hated guest’, told MPs he was manipulated into taking part in the programme.

He said his relationship troubles were brought up by producers who worked on the show in order to persuade him to appear. 

Davison said of one producer on the show: ‘He was trying to put a seed in my mind, to get me to go on the show.

‘Even though it was out of my head, he kept planting that seed. He would not take no for an answer.’

Chairman of the DCMS committee Damian Collins appeared shocked by the accounts of the treatment meted out on The Jeremy Kyle Show.

He said: ‘Someone in police custody would have more rights than you were given.’

Mr Davison added: ‘I told [producers] I don’t want the show shown anymore. It’s ruining my life mentally, physically, monetary wise. 

‘I’m going to lose my job because of an edited show. My life is a nightmare.’

Mr Davison said he did not want to go ahead with the show, but had already been taken by taxi to the studio and could not afford to get home from Manchester.

He said he attempted suicide in 2018 after becoming the show’s ‘most-hated’ guest, saying: ‘I wished I could die. It has ruined my life.

‘I can’t escape what he has done to me.

‘It’s like getting a dog and winding it up, getting another dog and winding it up, and setting them on each other.’ 

Mr Gregory added: ‘[Producers] completely changed the script.

‘I didn’t sign a form of consent, didn’t even know there was one. I never signed anything.

‘Being 70 [years old]…people have contacted me and I’ve had some pretty unpleasant conversations in my area, and from my past which wasn’t very nice.

‘I got a family out of it which is superb but the whole thing is tainted by the way it came about.

Dwayne Davison and Robert Gregory revealed they were subjected to taunts in the street and lost jobs after they appeared on the Jeremy Kyle Show

Dwayne Davison and Robert Gregory revealed they were subjected to taunts in the street and lost jobs after they appeared on the Jeremy Kyle Show

Dwayne Davison and Robert Gregory revealed they were subjected to taunts in the street and lost jobs after they appeared on the Jeremy Kyle Show

Mr Davison told producers of the show that he didn't want to do the show and that it was 'ruining his life'

Mr Davison told producers of the show that he didn't want to do the show and that it was 'ruining his life'

Mr Davison told producers of the show that he didn’t want to do the show and that it was ‘ruining his life’

Chairman of the DCMS committee Damian Collins (pictured) appeared shocked by the accounts of the treatment meted out on The Jeremy Kyle Show

Chairman of the DCMS committee Damian Collins (pictured) appeared shocked by the accounts of the treatment meted out on The Jeremy Kyle Show

Chairman of the DCMS committee Damian Collins (pictured) appeared shocked by the accounts of the treatment meted out on The Jeremy Kyle Show

‘I complained multiple times but you’re fobbed off. I complained about the banner on the programme. They said they couldn’t change it because ‘they’d be admitting we’re wrong.’

‘There should not be allowed another programme that absolute crucifies people and makes their lives hell. It should not be allowed.’ 

Love Island stars Yewande Biala and Marcel Somerville also revealed how their conversations on the show were set up by producers to make better television today.

Marcel Somerville, in May

Marcel Somerville, in May

Yewande Biala, in July

Yewande Biala, in July

Marcel Somerville (left) and Yewande Biala (right, both pictured arriving at Portcullis House in Westminster this afternoon) are offering evidence on their treatment on the ITV show

Biala and Somerville appear before the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee today

Biala and Somerville appear before the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee today

Biala and Somerville appear before the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee today

The duo told MPs investigating reality TV that they would sometimes to be asked to ‘hold off’ talking about something until another time to better ‘capture the moment’.  

They spoke after Love Island came under intense scrutiny over the aftercare it offers following the deaths of former contestants Sophie Gradon and Mike Thalassitis.

Talking about how the show was produced, Biala said: ‘I don’t really think the producers have a heavy hand in how you do things and what you say. I think, at the end of the day, it is reality TV.

‘There were instances where if I was sitting down having a conversation with somebody else and I was saying this is how I feel about this person, this is how I feel about this person, one of the producers could come up and say well, if you feel like that, would you not speak to that person?

The Love Island stars give evidence to the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee

The Love Island stars give evidence to the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee

The Love Island stars give evidence to the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee

‘And I think things like that have to happen in order to get the storyline out, in order to how I feel out, so the public can understand me better and the situation better.

‘It’s entirely left to you to be yourself. There’s no feedback given at all.’

Somerville added: ‘There were elements of time when, say for instance you were having a conversation about something that was going on in your experience and there would be times when they would ask you to hold off to another time when they could set up something to actually capture the moment.

‘So maybe you’d start talking about something and you’d be like ‘I’m feeling like this’, then someone would probably come in and basically say ‘can we just hold off on talking about this until a later date’. 

Yewande Biala in her promotional photo for Love Island series five, released in May

Yewande Biala in her promotional photo for Love Island series five, released in May

Yewande Biala in her promotional photo for Love Island series five, released in May

‘But they wouldn’t necessarily say to you, ‘you need to talk about this’ or ‘you need to explain this in a certain way’.’

Somerville said he jumped at the chance to join Love Island, after his agent found him work on the reality series.

He said: ‘I was doing little shows with my band Blazing Squad, but they were few and far between. So when I got the opportunity to do the show, I jumped at it.’

Somerville, who appeared in the ITV2 series in 2017, said his management had been approached the year before to ask if he’d be interested in participating.

Somerville said the time spent being filmed was the easy part of taking part in Love Island.

He said that the sudden fame on exiting the island villa was more difficult to deal with than filming.

The rapper said: ‘You are in the spotlight. No matter what you do, anything that happens there is going to be a story about it.

‘Public break-ups – everything that happens. You are like, ‘this is the worst period of my life’. That was the worst period of doing Love Island.’

He suggested that more help was needed by contestants after the show had aired.

How Love Island stars say show was set up 

Love Island bosses have been forced to deny a series of allegations of fakery during series of the show.

In July, they denied manipulating the show’s outcome after claims that producers forced Jordan Hames into flirting with India Reynolds.

There have also been claims that a torrid kiss between Jack Fowler and Georgia Steel in last year’s show was so fake that it had to be filmed ‘three or four times’ before it was ready to air.

ITV has acknowledged the show is a ‘combination of reality and produced elements’ but deny it is fake.

Talking today about how the show was set up, Yewande Biala: ‘If I was sitting down having a conversation with somebody else and I was saying this is how I feel about this person, this is how I feel about this person, one of the producers could come up and say well, if you feel like that, would you not speak to that person?’

Marcel Somerville added: ‘There were elements of time when, say for instance you were having a conversation about something that was going on in your experience and there would be times when they would ask you to hold off to another time when they could set up something to actually capture the moment.’

Somerville added: ‘Six months down the line when you are fully into dealing with the fame. They definitely changed it now with what happened to Mike and Sophie.’ 

Somerville said that after he left the show, he had contact with producers – but only due to other projects he was working on.

Beyond that, the former contestant said there was no support in place.

He said: ‘You are kind of left to your own devices. It wasn’t like a big thing of them contacting you. It wasn’t much of a ‘how are things going now’.’

With regard to being prepared for social media, he said: ‘Training-wise, I didn’t get told how to tweet or how to post, or what to expect from it.’

Somerville said he would welcome a diversity of body types on Love Island.

He said: ‘It would definitely add something to the show. All different kinds of people fall in love.

‘I think it would be a good thing to have a bit of variance in the figures.’

Biala said that she did not feel pressure to look good, other than a natural wish to feel good about her body.

She said: ‘If you knew you were going to be in a bikini for eight weeks, you would want to look your best.’

A contestant in this year’s series, Biala said she had applied herself.

Biala told the committee of MPs that being on the show was less intense than she expected from having watched previous series.

She said: ‘You watch it and there’s so much drama. But most of the time you’re just lying around. It was very chilled.’

The Irish former contestant said that dramatic events were not as frequent as the show presents.

She said: ‘I would say the storyline is created by you. I feel you have to create your own storyline. Every week is different. I thought it was going to be really intense.

‘Most of the time you are just hanging out. All you do is sit down and gossip really.’

Biala (right) on Love Island in Majorca in June with Amy Hart, Maura Higgins, Amber Gill, Molly-Mae Hague, Anna Vakili, Lucie Donlan and Elma Pazar

Biala (right) on Love Island in Majorca in June with Amy Hart, Maura Higgins, Amber Gill, Molly-Mae Hague, Anna Vakili, Lucie Donlan and Elma Pazar

Biala (right) on Love Island in Majorca in June with Amy Hart, Maura Higgins, Amber Gill, Molly-Mae Hague, Anna Vakili, Lucie Donlan and Elma Pazar

Sophie Gradon

Sophie Gradon

Mike Thalassitis

Mike Thalassitis

Love Island has come under scrutiny over the aftercare it offers following the deaths of former contestants Sophie Gradon (left) and Mike Thalassitis (right)

The committee are discussing ‘representations of race, gender and body image and contestant preparedness for life after Love Island’.

MPs will also hear from a former guest on The Jeremy Kyle Show, which was axed by ITV in May following the death of participant Steve Dymond.

Show guests Dwayne Davison and Robert Gregory will offer evidence about their time on the show having claimed, according to MPs, that ‘the aftercare given to them was not robust and has had a serious negative impact on their lives’.

The committee has also been investigating the use of lie detector and DNA tests on the former show.

The Jeremy Kyle Show

The Jeremy Kyle Show

Jeremy Kyle Show participant Steve Dymond

Jeremy Kyle Show participant Steve Dymond

MPs will also hear from a former guest on The Jeremy Kyle Show, which was axed by ITV in May following the death of participant Steve Dymond.

MPs have criticised TV bosses for not knowing enough about lie detector tests.

Mr Dymond, 63, died around a week after reportedly failing a love-cheat lie detector test on Kyle’s daytime show.

The construction worker was found in his room in Portsmouth on May 9 after splitting from on-off fiancee Jane Callaghan.

ITV recently announced Love Island will run for two series next year.

link

(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply