Johnson would secure majority as poll shows the Tory leader is twice as popular as Jeremy Corbyn

Voters would secure Boris Johnson a majority in a snap election as new poll shows the Tory leader is twice as popular as Jeremy Corbyn

Boris Johnson was chosen by 38 per cent of voters as the most favourable politician for Prime Minister compared to Mr Corbyn who was backed by just 17 per cent, according to the opinion poll by the Daily Express. 

The Conservatives led by a five-point lead over the Labour party in the race to form the next government, following research by opinion poll ComRes.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson was twice as popular than Corbyn as best candidate for Number 10 with one-in-three backing the Conservative Party if a general election was called

Prime Minister Boris Johnson was twice as popular than Corbyn as best candidate for Number 10 with one-in-three backing the Conservative Party if a general election was called

Prime Minister Boris Johnson was twice as popular than Corbyn as best candidate for Number 10 with one-in-three backing the Conservative Party if a general election was called

In another blow for the Labour Party, 41 per cent of voters said Mr Corbyn (pictured) was wrong to stop Mr Johnson calling a general election with just 31 per cent supporting the mov

In another blow for the Labour Party, 41 per cent of voters said Mr Corbyn (pictured) was wrong to stop Mr Johnson calling a general election with just 31 per cent supporting the mov

In another blow for the Labour Party, 41 per cent of voters said Mr Corbyn (pictured) was wrong to stop Mr Johnson calling a general election with just 31 per cent supporting the mov

It comes after Boris Johnson received a major Brexit boost last night as Brussels chiefs declared that a deal was possible within days.

The European Union gave the green light for a weekend of intense negotiations aimed at hammering out an agreement ahead of a crunch summit on Thursday.

The Prime Minister welcomed the step forward, but warned that ‘there’s a way to go’ and that it is not yet a ‘done deal’.

‘It’s important now that our negotiators on both sides get into proper talks about how to sort this thing out,’ he added.

Diplomats in Brussels said Mr Johnson had secured the breakthrough by agreeing to a customs border in the Irish Sea.

Speaking on a visit to a school yesterday afternoon, Mr Johnson said the new blueprint – which has been kept determinedly under wraps – would mean the ‘whole of the UK takes full advantage of Brexit’.

But he dodged when pressed on whether Northern Ireland will definitely leave the EU’s customs union, saying people should simply ‘look at what I have said before and draw their own conclusions’.

Officials are likely to holds talks over the weekend to ensure the Withdrawal Agreement blueprint can be drafted in time for next week’s EU summit. 

The data from the poll which questioned more than 2,000 people suggested voters were more likely to blame Parliament or the European Commission if the departure from the EU is delayed beyond Mr Johnson’s October 31 deadline. 

The election survey figures showing 33 per cent would back the Conservatives if a general election was called compared with 27 per cent for Labour

The election survey figures showing 33 per cent would back the Conservatives if a general election was called compared with 27 per cent for Labour

The election survey figures showing 33 per cent would back the Conservatives if a general election was called compared with 27 per cent for Labour 

Brexit Secretary Steve Barclay and Michel Barnier were all smiles today as they met for crucial talks as the sides make one last push for a deal

Brexit Secretary Steve Barclay and Michel Barnier were all smiles today as they met for crucial talks as the sides make one last push for a deal

Brexit Secretary Steve Barclay and Michel Barnier were all smiles today as they met for crucial talks as the sides make one last push for a deal

EU council president Donald Tusk (pictured in Cyprus today) hailed 'positive signs' in the discussions, but warned 'time has practically run out'

EU council president Donald Tusk (pictured in Cyprus today) hailed 'positive signs' in the discussions, but warned 'time has practically run out'

EU council president Donald Tusk (pictured in Cyprus today) hailed ‘positive signs’ in the discussions, but warned ‘time has practically run out’

An overwhelming majority of 85 per cent of voters said Parliament would bear the responsibility if the departure from the EU is delayed while 71 per cent thought the European Commission should share the blame.  

Senior Tory MP Nigel Evans said: ‘Corbyn is running a million miles from an election. 

‘Increasingly the voters are turning to Boris because they know he is the only leader in Parliament still trying to deliver on his promises, ‘ he told the Daily Express. 

After Johnson’s offer of a Brexit deal to the EU, the survey found one-in-three voters, 33 per cent, would back the Conservatives if a general election was called compared with 27 per cent for Labour. 

The Liberal Democrats were down one point at 18 per cent, while the Brexit Party headed up by Nigel Farage fell to 12 per cent, also down one since the poll at the beginning of the week. 

In terms of seats, Mr Johnson would have a lead of 14 with 332 in the Commons. 

This would mean 226 for Labour, 33 for the Lib Dems, 37 for the SNP, one Green and none for the Brexit Party, while a third of voters did not know which candidate to choose. 

And more than half of voters who voted Leave in the 2016 referendum said would vote Tory in a general election, according to the ComRes survey. 

Boris Johnson was found to be significantly more popular with men with 44 per cent in favour compared to 33 per cent of women.  

In another blow for the Labour Party, 41 per cent of voters said Mr Corbyn was wrong to stop Mr Johnson calling a general election with just 31 per cent supporting the move. 

Head of politics at ComRes Chris Hopkins said the public are as split over Brexit ‘as they have ever been’. 

Mr Hopkins added:’If a General Election is the way forward – and two in five adults disagree that opposition MPs were right to block Boris Johnson from calling one – then the Conservatives are currently sitting in the best position. 

What happens next in the Brexit crisis? 

Here is how the coming weeks could pan out:  

Today: Michel Barnier and Steve Barclay met in Brussels. 

They have agreed that negotiations can go into ‘the tunnel’.

That is the intensive, secret phase of talks where the teams have settled the main issues in principle and are trying to thrash out a joint legal text based.

Sunday: Angela Merkel and Emmanuel Macron are due to meet in France. The dinner will be a key waypointer to whether a deal will be possible next week. 

Monday: Parliament is due to return for the Queen’s Speech. 

In Brussels, the EU will ‘take stock’ with Mr Barnier over whether the legal text meets their criteria and can be put before leaders for approval. 

October 17-18: A crunch EU summit in Brussels. Any deal could be signed off by leaders here. If the talks have broken down, expect Boris Johnson to either boycott the event, or stage a dramatic walkout.

October 19: Parliament will sit on Saturday for the first time since the Falklands War. 

If there is no Brexit deal by this date Remainer legislation obliges the PM to beg the EU for an extension to avoid No Deal. Mr Johnson is likely to force a vote to make MPs ‘own’ any delay, having said he would rather ‘die in a ditch’ than accept one.

If there is a deal in place, there will be a make-or-break vote on whether to back it. If passed by the Commons, the government will start rushing legislation through Parliament immediately.  

Monday: Jeremy Corbyn has said that he will let Mr Johnson trigger an election after an extension has been secured. 

This would probably be the first day when a motion can be brought to a vote under the Fixed Term Parliaments Act, or a confidence vote can be held.

October 31: The current deadline for the UK to leave the EU, which Mr Johnson has previously described as ‘do or die’. 

Thursday, November 28: An election looks inevitable whichever way the Brexit drama goes. 

Legally there must be 25 working days between Parliament being dissolved and the election date.

This looks to be the most likely date for a poll, given they are traditionally held on Thursdays.  

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