‘Loch Ness monster’ is caught in 4k video by canoeist’s drone

The ‘Loch Ness monster’ has been caught in a video 4k video taken by a canoeist’s drone.

Footage shot by Richard Mavor, 54, shows a mysterious black shape on the banks of the lake in Scotland. 

The drone video zooms in on the dark Nessie-shaped shadow which wriggles as the camera gets closer. 

Mavor said there was no driftwood in the vicinity and that the shadow had ‘the same shape as previous sightings of Nessie’.

He was shooting for Youtube channel, Richard Outdoors, when he captured the remarkable footage in August. 

Mavor captured the footage on his drone while in Scotland, but did not notice the shadow lurking at the lake's banks until viewers on his YouTube channel pointed it out in the comments

Mavor captured the footage on his drone while in Scotland, but did not notice the shadow lurking at the lake's banks until viewers on his YouTube channel pointed it out in the comments

Mavor captured the footage on his drone while in Scotland, but did not notice the shadow lurking at the lake’s banks until viewers on his YouTube channel pointed it out in the comments

The Loch Ness monster is believed to resemble a prehistoric swimming reptile such as the plesiosaur (pictured)

The Loch Ness monster is believed to resemble a prehistoric swimming reptile such as the plesiosaur (pictured)

The Loch Ness monster is believed to resemble a prehistoric swimming reptile such as the plesiosaur (pictured)

He did not notice the shadow lurking at the edge of the footage until viewers on his channel pointed it out in the comments, according to the Daily Record

He said: ‘I couldn’t believe it. I had to rewind the footage several times and have watched it several times since.’

Mavor was wild camping doing the Great Glen Canoe Challenge –  a 60 mile paddle across Scotland – for the Alzheimer’s Society when he took the video. 

‘The more I watch it I think “crikey!” there really wasn’t anything in the area that could be,’ he added.   

‘We had just parked up and I thought I would get some nice shots on the beach for my Youtube. 

‘I didn’t notice what I had picked up until others told me to watch out for it. It could be a trick of the light but we can’t be sure.’

Mavor did not notice the shadow lurking at the edge of the footage until viewers on his channel pointed it out in the comments

Mavor did not notice the shadow lurking at the edge of the footage until viewers on his channel pointed it out in the comments

Mavor did not notice the shadow lurking at the edge of the footage until viewers on his channel pointed it out in the comments

It’s not the first sighting of the Loch Ness monster this year – at least five others have recorded ‘officially’ seeing the legendary beast. 

The first sighting was made by Kalynn Wangle, of Oregon, who reported a v-shaped wake near the left of the loch’s front shore at 11.42am on January 11.

And days later on January 19 long time Nessie watcher Eoin O’Fagan from Donegal, Ireland, spotted an unexplained dark spot on a webcam live stream at 2.20pm, towards the bottom right hand corner of the loch which came in and out of view for 20 minutes.

Just three days later on January 22 as Mr O’Fagan was watching the livestream again he made the third ‘official’ spotting of Nessie this year.  

An avid watcher of the webcam, Mr O’Fagan also reported the fourth sighting of the year on March 12 at 5.08pm.

He claims a black shape ‘rising up and down’ can be seen by a disturbance on the water with two smaller black shapes nearby.

The fifth sighting was made by Kalynn Wangle on March 17 at 4.15pm. She recorded catching sight of the very large dark shape that ‘appeared to be swimming’ before going behind a tree. 

A sixth potential sighting was made by Roslyn Casey from Leeds on March 26 at 5.46pm – but this spotting has not been confirmed. 

What IS the Loch Ness Monster?

Rumours of a strange creature living in the waters of Loch Ness have abounded over the decades, yet scant evidence has been found to back up these claims.

One of the first sightings, believed to have fuelled modern Nessie fever, came in May 2, 1933.  

On this date the Inverness Courier carried a story a local couple who claim to have seen ‘an enormous animal rolling and plunging on the surface.’

Another famous claimed sightings is a photograph taken in 1934 by Colonel Robert Kenneth Wilson.

It was later exposed as a hoax by one of the participants, Chris Spurling, who, on his deathbed, revealed that the pictures were staged.

Other sightings James Gray’s picture from 2001 when he and friend Peter Levings were out fishing on the Loch, while namesake Hugh Gray’s blurred photo of what appears to be a large sea creature was published in the Daily Express in 1933.

Robert Kenneth Wilson, a London physician, captured arguably the most famous image of the Loch Ness Monster. The surgeon’s photograph was published in the Daily Mail on April 21, 1934

Robert Kenneth Wilson, a London physician, captured arguably the most famous image of the Loch Ness Monster. The surgeon’s photograph was published in the Daily Mail on April 21, 1934

Robert Kenneth Wilson, a London physician, captured arguably the most famous image of the Loch Ness Monster. The surgeon’s photograph was published in the Daily Mail on April 21, 1934

The first reported sighting of the monster is said to have been made in 565AD by the Irish missionary St Columba when he came across a giant beast in the River Ness.

But no one has ever come up with a satisfactory explanation for the sightings – although in 2019, ‘Nessie expert’ Steve Feltham, who has spent 24 years watching the Loch, said he thought it was actually a giant Wels Catfish, native to waters near the Baltic and Caspian seas in Europe.

An online register lists more than 1,000 total Nessie sightings, created by Mr Campbell, the man behind the Official Loch Ness Monster Fan Club and is available at www.lochnesssightings.com. 

So what could explain these mysterious sightings? 

Many Nessie witnesses have mentioned large, crocodile-like scutes sitting atop the spine of the creature, leading some to believe an escaped amphibian may be to blame.

Native fish sturgeons can also weigh several hundred pounds and have ridged backs, which make them look almost reptilian.

Some believe Nessie is a long-necked plesiosaur – like an elasmosaur – that survived somehow when all the other dinosaurs were wiped out.

Others say the sightings are down to Scottish pines dying and flopping into the loch, before quickly becoming water-logged and sinking.

While submerged, botanical chemicals start trapping tiny bubbles of air.

Eventually, enough of these are gathered to propel the log upward as deep pressures begin altering its shape, giving the appearance of an animal coming up for air.

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