LPA creative director Lara Pia Arrobio under fire for hijab photos

The creative director of the brand behind a line of sweatshirts widely deemed fatphobic has come under fire again after photos of her wearing a hijab as a costume surfaced.

Lara Pia Arrobio is the creative director of LPA, a fashion brand that partnered with retailer Revolve for a new line of sweaters.

The sweaters, which featured messages such as ‘Being fat is not beautiful it’s an excuse’, were ironically supposed to raise awareness about online trolls but ended up drawing outrage because they appeared to be fat-shaming.

Offensive: Lara Pia Arrobio, the creative director of LPA, has come under fire again after photos of her wearing a hijab as a costume surfaced

Offensive: Lara Pia Arrobio, the creative director of LPA, has come under fire again after photos of her wearing a hijab as a costume surfaced

Offensive: Lara Pia Arrobio, the creative director of LPA, has come under fire again after photos of her wearing a hijab as a costume surfaced

Timeline: The photos appear to have been shared on October 31, 2011 and November 1, 2011, suggesting that the outfit was worn as a Halloween costume

Timeline: The photos appear to have been shared on October 31, 2011 and November 1, 2011, suggesting that the outfit was worn as a Halloween costume

Timeline: The photos appear to have been shared on October 31, 2011 and November 1, 2011, suggesting that the outfit was worn as a Halloween costume

On Sunday, the Instagram account @diet_prada, which regularly calls out influencers in the fashion industry for plagiarism and other behavior, shared a series of photos featuring Arrobio in the offensive costume.

Position: Arrobio is the creative director of LPA, a fashion brand that partnered with retailer Revolve for a new line of sweaters widely deemed fatphobic

Position: Arrobio is the creative director of LPA, a fashion brand that partnered with retailer Revolve for a new line of sweaters widely deemed fatphobic

Position: Arrobio is the creative director of LPA, a fashion brand that partnered with retailer Revolve for a new line of sweaters widely deemed fatphobic

The images unveiled by Diet Prada appeared to have been posted to Arrobio’s Instagram account and now seem to have been deleted.

One of the images shows a group of women in covering black robes with long sleeves and a headdress, apparently attending a party.

The photos appear to have been shared on October 31, 2011 and November 1, 2011, suggesting that the outfit was worn as a Halloween costume.

One of the captions, posted below the photo that shows three women each in their version of the outfit, reads: ‘We keep on getting hit and it’s weird.’

Another image, captioned ‘uh huh’ appears to show two of the women lifting their garb up to reveal garter belts and hosiery.

Diet Prada pointed out in a post that the photos take on additional meaning in light of the accusations of tone-deafness directed towards LPA in relation to the new line of sweaters.  

Post: One image, captioned 'uh huh' appears to show two of the women lifting their garb up to reveal garter belts and hosiery

Post: One image, captioned 'uh huh' appears to show two of the women lifting their garb up to reveal garter belts and hosiery

Post: One image, captioned ‘uh huh’ appears to show two of the women lifting their garb up to reveal garter belts and hosiery

Reveal: On Sunday, the Instagram account @diet_prada , which regularly calls out influencers for various types of behavior, shared a series of photos

Reveal: On Sunday, the Instagram account @diet_prada , which regularly calls out influencers for various types of behavior, shared a series of photos

Reveal: On Sunday, the Instagram account @diet_prada , which regularly calls out influencers for various types of behavior, shared a series of photos

Career: Arrobio has been the creative director of LPA since September 2015

Career: Arrobio has been the creative director of LPA since September 2015

Career: Arrobio has been the creative director of LPA since September 2015

‘As someone who’s recently come under fire for her inability to contextualize concepts and understand accountability when it comes to feminism specifically, it’s no surprise these instagrams from @lpa’s @piaarrobio were unearthed,’ the account wrote.

‘I think we can probably all agree it’s not an appropriate Halloween outfit… White feminism and Islamophobia in a nutshell for ya.’

Many Instagram users expressed their shock in the comments section, deeming the photos ‘problematic’ and ‘gross’.

‘Wow. This is extremely offensive,’ one person write, while someone else found the costume ‘f*****g gross and tasteless’.

‘Wow absolutely shocking @lpa consider yourself cancelled @piaarrobio,’ another person commented. 

Past: Some people referenced a 2016 post that still appears on Arrobio's account, which features a cake with the words 'You should throw this up' written in icing on top of it

Past: Some people referenced a 2016 post that still appears on Arrobio's account, which features a cake with the words 'You should throw this up' written in icing on top of it

Past: Some people referenced a 2016 post that still appears on Arrobio’s account, which features a cake with the words ‘You should throw this up’ written in icing on top of it

Message: In her caption, Arrobio said she's not 'pro bulimia' but 'pro cake'

Message: In her caption, Arrobio said she's not 'pro bulimia' but 'pro cake'

Message: In her caption, Arrobio said she’s not ‘pro bulimia’ but ‘pro cake’

Some people referenced a 2016 post that still appears on Arrobio’s account, which features a cake with the words ‘You should throw this up’ written in icing on top of it.

‘I’m so good at gift giving also do not say I’m pro bulimia this post is clearly pro cake,’ she wrote in the caption, before addressing a message to one of her friends: ‘I hope you ate all your emotions today Rebs.’

DailyMail.com has reached out to Arrobio and LPA for comment.

Another brand became caught in the controversy when someone sent Diet Prada a direct message saying Reformation’s ‘two head women’ once made pattern makers stop their work to make identical costumes for them.

Reformation, an enormously popular clothing label previously backed by Karlie Kloss, was founded by former model Yael Aflalo, now 41 and the CEO of the brand.

Diet Prada shared the message on its Instagram story, along with a screenshot of a conversation between the account and someone who said they were ‘that pattern maker’.

Conversation: Someone sent Diet Prada a direct message saying Reformation's 'two head women' once made pattern makers stop their work to make identical costumes for them

Conversation: Someone sent Diet Prada a direct message saying Reformation's 'two head women' once made pattern makers stop their work to make identical costumes for them

Exchange: That person then appeared to reach out in a separate message

Exchange: That person then appeared to reach out in a separate message

Conversation: Someone sent Diet Prada a direct message saying Reformation’s ‘two head women’ once made pattern makers stop their work to make identical costumes for them (left). That person then appeared to reach out in a separate message (right)

‘First job in New York City and that was probably one of the milder things that went on there,’ that person said. 

The account asked that person what they thought of the request when it was made, to which the person responded: ‘That at some point in time this would come back to haunt them and how highly inappropriate it was.’ 

The outrage comes less than a week after LPA and Revolve came under fire for its line of sweatshirts.  

Florence Givens, an artist and social issues advocate, first posted a series of pictures from the Revolve website on her Instagram account of models wearing sweaters priced at $168 with controversial quotes.

At the end of each quote in small font there was a ‘as said to (woman’s name)’ line to highlight the phrases specific people encountered in their own life. The women who provided the troll quotes were Lena Dunham, Emily Ratajkowski, Cara Delevingne, Suki Waterhouse and Paloma Elsesser.

Problematic: Revolve previously released a series of sweatshirts on its website that featured controversial quotes said to prominent women

Problematic: Revolve previously released a series of sweatshirts on its website that featured controversial quotes said to prominent women

Problematic: Revolve previously released a series of sweatshirts on its website that featured controversial quotes said to prominent women

Unclear: Fashion brand LPA had Lena Dunham, Emily Ratajkowski, Cara Delevingne, Suki Waterhouse and Paloma Elsesser each submit a quote posted by an internet troll for the shirts

Unclear: Fashion brand LPA had Lena Dunham, Emily Ratajkowski, Cara Delevingne, Suki Waterhouse and Paloma Elsesser each submit a quote posted by an internet troll for the shirts

Unclear: Fashion brand LPA had Lena Dunham, Emily Ratajkowski, Cara Delevingne, Suki Waterhouse and Paloma Elsesser each submit a quote posted by an internet troll for the shirts

LPA, which collaborated with Revolve for these new shirts, explained in a message chain with Florence that collection was rolled out earlier than intended without the meaning behind it.

Once the realized Revolve released the items online, the brand implored the company to take them down ahead of the official launch  

‘It’s a collaboration with five women with the worst troll quotes,’ the brand explained to the account in a message. 

‘The point was to shine a light on how horrible trolling is.’ 

But this message had the opposite effect as more and more people saw pictures of the thin models wearing what appeared to be a fat-shaming sweatshirt. 

Other slogans were included in the collaboration including one that stated ‘too boney to be boned’ and another that read ‘if you translated a bum onto her face, she’d have a better face.’ 

According to LPA, the brand was going to launch the sweaters on its own website with each of the five prominent women modeling them in a selfie. 

Confused: Many people took to Twitter to express their disappointment in the collection because it appeared to promote fat shaming

Confused: Many people took to Twitter to express their disappointment in the collection because it appeared to promote fat shaming

Confused: Many people took to Twitter to express their disappointment in the collection because it appeared to promote fat shaming

Bad choice: Many brought up how Revolve put the sweatshirt talking about weight on a thin model

Bad choice: Many brought up how Revolve put the sweatshirt talking about weight on a thin model

Bad choice: Many brought up how Revolve put the sweatshirt talking about weight on a thin model

Not a fan: Twitter exploded on Wednesday after the pictures were released of the sweatshirts

Not a fan: Twitter exploded on Wednesday after the pictures were released of the sweatshirts

Not a fan: Twitter exploded on Wednesday after the pictures were released of the sweatshirts

Proceeds from the sale would then go towards an undisclosed charity.  

The issue many people had online, besides just the slogan, was the model wearing the fat-shaming message.

‘Someone explain to me how thin people wearing these sweaters are supposed to aid in any type of empowerment for fat people?’ One person wrote after seeing the sweatshirt. 

‘Because to me, it just looks like some straight up fatphobia.’ 

Florence also described the clothing as a ‘problematic’ marketing decision in a message to her followers.

‘This is still incredibly problematic and an awful attempt at ‘claiming back’ toxic narratives because (in my opinion) it just gives them power by putting them back into the world,’ she wrote after revealing the conversation with LPA.

Other commenters expressed their disgust for the clothing item calling it ‘insulting’ and another way for trolls to fat shame other people. 

Involved: Suki Waterhouse (pictured) and Emily Ratajkowski were two of the five women who submitted quotes for the sweatshirts, but that wasn't clear to customers

Involved: Suki Waterhouse (pictured) and Emily Ratajkowski were two of the five women who submitted quotes for the sweatshirts, but that wasn't clear to customers

Involved: Suki Waterhouse and Emily Ratajkowski (pictured) were two of the five women who submitted quotes for the sweatshirts, but that wasn't clear to customers

Involved: Suki Waterhouse and Emily Ratajkowski (pictured) were two of the five women who submitted quotes for the sweatshirts, but that wasn't clear to customers

Involved: Suki Waterhouse (left) and Emily Ratajkowski (right) were two of the five women who submitted quotes for the sweatshirts, but that wasn’t clear to customers 

Positive? Paloma Elsesser (pictured) and Lena Dunham also submitted quotes of their own that they received from online trolls

Positive? Paloma Elsesser (pictured) and Lena Dunham also submitted quotes of their own that they received from online trolls

Positive? Paloma Elsesser and Lena Dunham (pictured) also submitted quotes of their own that they received from online trolls

Positive? Paloma Elsesser and Lena Dunham (pictured) also submitted quotes of their own that they received from online trolls

Positive? Paloma Elsesser (left) and Lena Dunham (right) also submitted quotes of their own that they received from online trolls 

Collaborative: The fifth person involved with the sweaters was model Cara Delevingne. LPA was going to launch them on its own website with the five females wearing them in a selfie 

Collaborative: The fifth person involved with the sweaters was model Cara Delevingne. LPA was going to launch them on its own website with the five females wearing them in a selfie 

Collaborative: The fifth person involved with the sweaters was model Cara Delevingne. LPA was going to launch them on its own website with the five females wearing them in a selfie 

Felicity Hayward, a model and founder of Self Love Brings Beauty, was another person to express their disdain for the sweatshirt on Twitter. 

She told DailyMail.com: ‘Beauty is not based on size, but ignorance is based on insecurity, revolve are trash and are either so ignorant that they think this message is acceptable, or so insecure that they have to play off body shaming in order to gain attention.

Tess Holiday, a plus-sized model who garnered attention earlier this month for her Cosmopolitan UK cover, even joined in on the conversation saying Revolve was ‘a mess’ for releasing the sweatshirts online. 

None of the five women who submitted the quotes have released a statement about the controversy.  

A spokesperson for Revolve confirmed to DailyMail.com that the collection had been ‘released prematurely’ on its site, adding that the pieces were intended for debut on Thursday to serve ‘as a direct commentary on the modern day ‘normality’ of cyber-bullying and the shared desire to create a community for those most affected by the epidemic’.

She added: ‘We at Revolve sincerely apologize to all those involved – particularly Lena, Emily, Cara, Suki and Paloma – our loyal customers, and the community as a whole for this error.

‘The collection has been pulled. We are proud to donate $20,000 to ‘Girls Write Now’ in the hopes that those who need it can still benefit from what was to be a meaningful, insightful and impactful collaboration by LPA.’

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