‘Ma’amageddon’! Speech prepared for the Queen in the event of nuclear bombs hitting Britain

In the horrifying moments before the nuclear armageddon of a Third World War, the Queen was to speak of ‘the madness of war’ and Labour leader Michael Foot was to be arrested, secret documents have revealed.

In a speech to be delivered if nuclear war broke out, Her Majesty was to say ominously: ‘The enemy is not the soldier with his rifle, nor even the airman prowling the skies above our cities and towns, but the deadly power of abused technology.’

A startling new exhibition at the National Archives includes the full text of the speech written for Her Majesty in 1983, which she would have delivered in the event that the Cold War flashed thermonuclear.

In another scenario war-gamed by civil servants, the hard-Left leader of the Labour Party, Michael Foot, would have been taken into police custody at a peace rally alongside Archbishop of Canterbury Robert Runcie.

The speech written for the Queen was dubbed ‘Ma’amageddon’ by civil servants. 

It was written in 1983 by civil servants and was to be delivered by the Queen as Britain waited for bombs to drop

It was written in 1983 by civil servants and was to be delivered by the Queen as Britain waited for bombs to drop

It was written in 1983 by civil servants and was to be delivered by the Queen as Britain waited for bombs to drop

In the speech, to be delivered as the country waited for the warheads to land, the Queen would have said: ‘Now this madness of war is once more spreading through the world and our brave country must again prepare itself to survive against great odds.

‘I have never forgotten the sorrow and pride I felt as my sister and I huddled around the nursery wireless set listening to my father’s inspiring words on that fateful day in 1939. Not for a single moment did I imagine that this solemn and awful duty would fall to me.

‘We all know that the dangers facing us today are greater by far than at any time in our long history. The enemy is not the soldier with his rifle nor even the airman prowling the skies above our cities and towns but the deadly power of abused technology.

‘But whatever terrors lie in wait for us all the qualities that have helped to keep our freedom intact twice already during this sad century will once more be our strength.’ 

The secret contingency plans, including this speech written for the Queen, are now on display

The secret contingency plans, including this speech written for the Queen, are now on display

The secret contingency plans, including this speech written for the Queen, are now on display

The speech is being revealed at London 's National Archives in an exhibition called Britain's Cold War Revealed, which begins on Thursday

The speech is being revealed at London 's National Archives in an exhibition called Britain's Cold War Revealed, which begins on Thursday

The speech is being revealed at London ‘s National Archives in an exhibition called Britain’s Cold War Revealed, which begins on Thursday

the speech was designed as part of a range of fictional scenarios thought up by civil servants during the Cold War.  

Another scenario saw the arrest of 1980s Labour leader Michael Foot and the Archbishop of Canterbury at a peace rally. 

Also revealed in the exhibition was the so-called ‘naughty document’ on which Winston Churchill carved up Europe with Josef Stalin. 

Britain’s wartime leader made the secret pact with Moscow in 1944 as the Allies closed in on victory over Nazi Germany

The sheet of paper showed the percentages of Bulgaria, Greece, Hungary, Romania and Yugoslavia which would be under Soviet or British control. 

'Naughty document:' This 1944 scrap of paper shows Winston Churchill's secret pact with Josef Stalin to carve up post-war Europe between Russia and the Western allies

'Naughty document:' This 1944 scrap of paper shows Winston Churchill's secret pact with Josef Stalin to carve up post-war Europe between Russia and the Western allies

‘Naughty document:’ This 1944 scrap of paper shows Winston Churchill’s secret pact with Josef Stalin to carve up post-war Europe between Russia and the Western allies 

Opening tomorrow, exactly 70 years since NATO was formed, the programme will mark a series of Cold War milestones and will run until the end of November 2019, the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.

The immersive exhibition recreates a government bunker and a 1980s living room, showing the impact of the Cold War on government and on ordinary people’s lives.

Mark Dunton, Contemporary Records Specialist at The National Archives and Curator of the exhibition, said: ‘People will have the opportunity to explore our Cold War documents and learn more about this period of secrets and paranoia.

‘The pervasive threat of nuclear war impacted everyday life for millions of people and this thought-provoking exhibition will offer a unique look into political and ideological tensions between the East and West.’

An array of original documents will be on display, including political memos, spy confessions, civil defence posters and even a letter from Winston Churchill to the Queen.

These documents will provide visitors with a rare glimpse into the complexities of government operations during this time of infiltration and betrayal.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a programme of high profile events exploring the Cold War from a multitude of perspectives. Speakers will include Dame Stella Rimington, former Director General of MI5.

Winston Churchill’s ‘naughty document’ showing his plans to carve up Europe with Stalin after World War Two goes on display for first time

The so-called ‘naughty document’ on which Winston Churchill carved up Europe with Josef Stalin is set to go on public display for the first time. 

Britain’s wartime leader made the secret pact with Moscow in 1944 as the Allies closed in on victory over Nazi Germany

The sheet of paper showed the percentages of Bulgaria, Greece, Hungary, Romania and Yugoslavia which would be under Soviet or British control. 

It is going on display at London‘s National Archives in an exhibition called Britain’s Cold War Revealed, which begins on Thursday. 

'Naughty document:' This 1944 scrap of paper shows Winston Churchill's secret pact with Josef Stalin to carve up post-war Europe between Russia and the Western allies

'Naughty document:' This 1944 scrap of paper shows Winston Churchill's secret pact with Josef Stalin to carve up post-war Europe between Russia and the Western allies

‘Naughty document:’ This 1944 scrap of paper shows Winston Churchill’s secret pact with Josef Stalin to carve up post-war Europe between Russia and the Western allies 

Wartime allies: Russian dictator Josef Stalin (left) and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill (right) made the agreement which Churchill acknowledged could be seen as 'callous'

Wartime allies: Russian dictator Josef Stalin (left) and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill (right) made the agreement which Churchill acknowledged could be seen as 'callous'

Wartime allies: Russian dictator Josef Stalin (left) and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill (right) made the agreement which Churchill acknowledged could be seen as ‘callous’ 

What was in the ‘naughty document’? 

The ‘naughty document’, also known as the Percentages Agreement, revealed Churchill and Stalin’s plans to carve up post-war Europe. 

Churchill revealed its existence in one of his World War II memoirs. 

The note begins by saying that it was written by the PM during a meeting with Stalin at the Kremlin.  

It reads: 

Roumania 

Russia – 90 per cent

The others – 10 per cent

Greece 

Great Britain, in accord with USA – 90 per cent

Russia – 10 per cent

Yugoslavia 

50/50 per cent

Hungary 

50/50 per cent

Bulgaria 

Russia – 75 per cent

The others – 25 per cent  

The phrase ‘naughty document’ was coined by Churchill himself, who recognised that it could come over as ‘callous’. 

Churchill said his American allies would be ‘shocked if they saw how crudely he had put it’.

The document contains a handwritten tick believed to have been scrawled by Stalin as he approved the carve-up of post-war Europe. 

The exhibition’s chief curator Mark Dunton told the Daily Telegraph: ‘This was the result of late night discussions between Churchill and Stalin, they both had a fair bit of whiskey.

‘I think it’s important that this document is going on display because there’s so much significance in that little square of paper.

‘It’s potentially incredibly significant – the fate of millions being decided with the stroke of a pen as a result of a casual meeting.’ 

The document did not discuss Poland, which Churchill had hoped to keep in the Western fold but which fell into Moscow’s sphere of influence in 1945. 

Despite his talks in Moscow Churchill also contemplated an ‘Operation Unthinkable’ war with Russia to drive Stalin’s forces out of Eastern Europe.  

Destruction: A map showing the destruction after an H-bomb attack on London, which is part of a Cold War exhibition at the National Archives which begins on Thursday

Destruction: A map showing the destruction after an H-bomb attack on London, which is part of a Cold War exhibition at the National Archives which begins on Thursday

Destruction: A map showing the destruction after an H-bomb attack on London, which is part of a Cold War exhibition at the National Archives which begins on Thursday 

Cold War danger: A recreation of an under-the-stairs nuclear fallout bunker, with a 'Protect and Survive' booklet sitting on a chair

Cold War danger: A recreation of an under-the-stairs nuclear fallout bunker, with a 'Protect and Survive' booklet sitting on a chair

Cold War danger: A recreation of an under-the-stairs nuclear fallout bunker, with a ‘Protect and Survive’ booklet sitting on a chair

A woman looks at the exhibition

A woman looks at the exhibition

A portrait of the Queen over documents relating to the Cambridge spy ring

A portrait of the Queen over documents relating to the Cambridge spy ring

Visitor: A woman looks at the exhibition at the National Archives in London (left) which includes documents relating to the Cambridge spy ring (right)

By the late 1940s the wartime alliance had broken down, prompting the foundation of NATO to safeguard the Western alliance. 

Churchill also coined the term ‘iron curtain’ to describe the new political division of Europe between East and West after the war. 

The Berlin crisis of 1948-49, in which Stalin blockaded West Berlin in a failed bid to force the Western Allies out, was one of the early flashpoints of the Cold War.  

The new exhibition in London, which runs from April 4 until November 9, marks 70 years since the birth of NATO. 

Announcing it last year, Mr Dunton said: ‘People will have the opportunity to explore our Cold War documents and learn more about this period of secrets and paranoia. 

‘The pervasive threat of nuclear war impacted everyday life for millions of people and this thought-provoking exhibition will offer a unique look into political and ideological tensions between the East and West.’ 

A collection of civil defence posters are on display during the preview of the National Archives new exhibition

A collection of civil defence posters are on display during the preview of the National Archives new exhibition

A collection of civil defence posters are on display during the preview of the National Archives new exhibition

A investigation file into one of the Cambridge Spies is seen during the preview of the National Archives new exhibition, Protect and Survive: Britain's Cold War Revealed

A investigation file into one of the Cambridge Spies is seen during the preview of the National Archives new exhibition, Protect and Survive: Britain's Cold War Revealed

A investigation file into one of the Cambridge Spies is seen during the preview of the National Archives new exhibition, Protect and Survive: Britain’s Cold War Revealed

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