Married Christian GP faces being struck off for sexual misconduct claims by female patients

A married Christian doctor fighting for his career after facing charges of sexual misconduct allegedly hugged a female patient after telling her she was ‘very hot’. 

Dr Stuart Creed, 51, faces being struck off the medical register after two women reported the Cambridge dermatologist to the General Medical Council. 

The ‘over familiar’ GP, who teaches the Bible to children in two local church groups, is accused of making various unsolicited advances towards Patients A and B. 

Both women claim that Dr Creed asked inappropriate and probing questions about their sexual lives, for whom he had a duty of care.

The alleged incidents are said to have occurred as he worked at the York Street Medical Practice and the Buckden Surgery between 2015 and 2018.

According to the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service (MPTS), eight allegations of sexual misconduct against Dr Creed have been made.   

Dr Stuart Creed (pictured) faces being struck off the medical register after two women reported the Cambridge dermatologist to the General Medical Council

Dr Stuart Creed (pictured) faces being struck off the medical register after two women reported the Cambridge dermatologist to the General Medical Council

Dr Stuart Creed (pictured) faces being struck off the medical register after two women reported the Cambridge dermatologist to the General Medical Council

Patient A, who had been signed off work with anxiety and had suffered hair loss, was allegedly described by the GP as ‘really fit’. 

She accused Dr Creed of asking ‘how many times a week’ she had sex during one home visit, and said that she would find another partner ‘very easily’.   

Dr Creed also allegedly confessed to ‘really caring’ for Patient A ‘as a person’ and said she was ‘perfect’ in March 2017. 

The female patient accused Dr Creed of telling her: ‘Maybe I shouldn’t say that but I really like you as a person. 

‘I know this wrong but you’re very hot – can I give you a hug?’    

Meanwhile, psoriasis-stricken Patient B accused the doctor of giving compliments about her appearance and saying she looked ‘lovely and just fine’. 

The alleged incidents are said to have occurred as he worked at the York Street Medical Practice (pictured) and the Buckden Surgery between 2015 and 2018

The alleged incidents are said to have occurred as he worked at the York Street Medical Practice (pictured) and the Buckden Surgery between 2015 and 2018

The alleged incidents are said to have occurred as he worked at the York Street Medical Practice (pictured) and the Buckden Surgery between 2015 and 2018

She also claimed that Dr Creed unexpectedly turned up at the car showroom at which she worked for unscheduled ‘consultations’. 

Dr Creed today admitted to hugging Patient A and turning up unannounced at Patient B’s workplace, but denied making sexually-charged remarks and advances.

He has also denied trying to engage in inappropriate emotional relationships. 

Dr Creed also revealed that he rang Patient B to apologise for turning up at the car showroom, fearing she would report him to police. 

He described himself at the MPTS hearing as a GP ‘who goes the extra mile and who has a long history of patient positivity about me’. 

The allegations Dr Creed faces that could RUIN his career (according to a MPTS summary document) 

1. Between February 2015 and March 2017:

a. during consultations with Patient A at York Street Medical Practice, Cambridge (‘the Practice’), you:

i. said to Patient A:

a) ‘you look really fit‘, or words to that effect;

b) ‘your husband is really lucky‘, or words to that effect;

ii. told Patient A that she would find another partner very easily, or words to that effect;

iii. made comments on Patient A’s physical appearance on one or more occasions;

b. you attended Patient A’s home address on one or more occasions when Patient A told you that she was happy to the come to the Practice, or words to that effect.

2. On or around 30 March 2017 you:

a. insisted on visiting Patient A at home when she told you that a home visit was ‘not needed’, or words to that effect;

b. attended Patient A’s home address and you:

i. started to hold her hand until Patient A pushed you away;

ii. told Patient A:

a) ‘you should stop worrying, you are perfect the way you are‘, or words to that effect;

b) ‘I have tried in [sic] other occasions to let you know that I feel something. It is difficult for me to say’, or words to that effect;

c) ‘I really care about you, you know that. Maybe I shouldn’t say that but I really like you as a person’, or words to that effect;

d) ‘I know this is wrong, but you are very hot…can I give you a hug’, or words to that effect;

c. hugged Patient A; Admitted and found proved

d. asked Patient A ‘how many times a week do you have sex?’, or words to that effect. 

3. Between October 2017 and February 2018, during consultations with Patient B at Buckden Surgery (‘the Surgery’), you:

a. told Patient B:

i. ‘I don’t know what you’re worrying about, you look just fine’, or words to that effect; Admitted and found proved

ii. that she was ‘lovely’ and ‘just right’, or words to that effect;

iii. ‘I think your hair looks nice’, or words to that effect; Admitted and found proved

iv. ‘it doesn’t matter as you aren’t having sex anyway’, or words to that effect;

v. that you would ‘pop in’ and see her at work, or words to that effect.

4. On 3 October 2017, during a consultation with Patient B at the Surgery, you said ‘oh well I think he’s an idiot because you look lovely’, or words to that effect, when Patient B told you that she had separated from her husband.

5. In March 2018 you:

a. attended Patient B’s workplace on one or more occasions;

b. walked up to Patient B’s desk at her workplace and sat down and:

i. said ‘Hi, how’s your head’, or words to that effect; Admitted and found proved

ii. told Patient B that you ‘really did try and fix it’ when referring to Patient B’s head, or words to that effect; Admitted and found proved

iii. asked Patient B questions about her job; Admitted and found proved

iv. told Patient B that you had been by to see her at work a few times and every time she had been busy, or words to that effect;

c. drove very slowly past Patient B’s workplace, whilst looking at her through the window.

6. In or around April 2018, without any clinical justification, you:

a. telephoned Patient B’s mobile telephone on one or more occasions; Admitted and found proved

b. left a voicemail for Patient B on her mobile telephone; Admitted and found proved

c. telephoned Patient B’s house on at least one occasion; Admitted and found proved

d. sent a text message to Patient B. Admitted and found proved

7. You attempted to engage in an inappropriate emotional relationship with:

a. Patient A in relation to your actions as described in paragraphs 1 – 2;

b. Patient B in relation to your actions as described in paragraphs 3 – 5.

8. Your actions as set out at paragraphs 1 to 5 above were sexually motivated.

And that by reason of the matters set out above your fitness to practice is impaired because of your misconduct.

According to the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service, eight allegations of sexual misconduct against Dr Creed have been made (pictured, Buckden Surgery)

According to the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service, eight allegations of sexual misconduct against Dr Creed have been made (pictured, Buckden Surgery)

According to the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service, eight allegations of sexual misconduct against Dr Creed have been made (pictured, Buckden Surgery)

The devout Christian GP told the hearing: ‘Part of my role as a doctor is to try to reassure patients and when they are upset about something it seems to me to be an appropriate thing to say: ‘your hair looks fine to me’.’ 

He continued: ‘I’m a doctor who had had 25 years of patients thanking me, praising me and appreciating me for going the extra mile. I’m providing reassurance with no other motive here and I’m trying to give my patient the benefit of the doubt but obviously my mindset is wrong and it needs to be much more aware.  

‘What’s happened has been a massive wake up call for me – I’m not a stalker.’ 

Italian-speaking Patient A told the tribunal: ‘I let him in [her home] but then the way he was looking at me and talking to me made me feel uncomfortable.

‘It is like there was a desire – he was trying to keep professional but he was doing more than just being there to check if I had an infection. He listened to my pulse after he held my hand but he wouldn’t let go straight after he felt my pulse.

‘We were talking about chronic fatigue syndrome and then he asked me to lay on the sofa and checked my abdomen. He sat next to me on the sofa and then it was very uncomfortable as he told me about his feelings and began making compliments.

Dr Creed admitted to hugging Patient A and turning up unannounced at Patient B's workplace, but denied making sexually-charged remarks and advances. He has also denied trying to engage in inappropriate emotional relationships with them

Dr Creed admitted to hugging Patient A and turning up unannounced at Patient B's workplace, but denied making sexually-charged remarks and advances. He has also denied trying to engage in inappropriate emotional relationships with them

Dr Creed admitted to hugging Patient A and turning up unannounced at Patient B’s workplace, but denied making sexually-charged remarks and advances. He has also denied trying to engage in inappropriate emotional relationships with them

‘That’s when I came up with the excuse that I had to go shopping and when I told him to leave. Eventually, he left but he was there for at least half an hour.’

Recalling her visits to his surgery, she added: ‘He would say that I was fit, very fit and that I won’t have any problems to find someone else. 

‘He was asking me about my personal life and how was my partner. 

‘Maybe we had had some argument and the doctor would say “you won’t have any problems to find someone else – you are very attractive”. I

‘ thought at first these comments were made to raise my self-esteem – but it wasn’t just compliments that a friend might say to make you feel better and that’s why I felt uncomfortable.’

Dr Creed, who has since attended a course on doctor patient boundaries, told the MPTS hearing: ‘Maybe I had said things that had upset her in a way I hadn’t picked up on but she definitely gave me her consent to visit. There was not the faintest suggestion that she was upset at that time and I strongly disagree that I held her hand and I strongly deny using the words “you’re hot”.

‘It’s a long time since I have been chatting up my wife as we have been married for over 20 years. I use words like “beautiful” – “hot” is a crude word.’      

Patient B claimed that Dr Creed had responded to news at his surgery that she split from her boyfriend: ‘He’s an idiot because you look lovely.’   

Responding to claims that he turned up ‘unannounced’ at her place of work in March 2018, Dr Creed said: ‘It is absolutely inappropriate to visit a patient at work but I thought I’d failed her and wanted to find out how she was.

‘I was on my day off and I was visiting the supermarket and my professional hat wasn’t on when it should have been and I thought I’ll just pop in and see her.

‘She was a bit short with her answers and kept looking occasionally to the person who worked there. I was picking up very much on her body language because that gave me a feeling that she’s not happy about this and I quickly left. 

‘I thought about going back but then I thought that was even more inappropriate. I just want to reassure her I’m not a stalker and there’s been a mistake made.’ 

The hearing continues.

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