Mint flavouring in e-cigarettes contains high levels of potential cancer-causing ingredient

Artificial mint-flavouring in e-cigarettes has been found to contain high levels of a potentially cancerous ingredient, research has found.

The study revealed raised concentrations of the carcinogenic additive pulegone in menthol and peppermint vapes.

Even moderate users of vaping products are significantly outside the ‘safe’ threshold of absorption of the substance, the study found. 

The study revealed raised concentrations of the carcinogenic additive pulegone in menthol and peppermint vapes (file image)

The study revealed raised concentrations of the carcinogenic additive pulegone in menthol and peppermint vapes (file image)

The study revealed raised concentrations of the carcinogenic additive pulegone in menthol and peppermint vapes (file image)

Vaping products contain higher levels of the additive than menthol cigarettes, which have minimised use of the additive due to health concerns.

Pulegone – extracted from mint plants – is reported to cause liver cancer if ingested in high enough quantities. 

Researchers urged regulators to take precautionary steps, as it is not known if the potentially dangerous additive is absorbed through e-cigarettes in the same way as through food.

Vaping products contain higher levels of the additive than menthol cigarettes, which have minimised use of the additive due to health concerns (file image)

Vaping products contain higher levels of the additive than menthol cigarettes, which have minimised use of the additive due to health concerns (file image)

Vaping products contain higher levels of the additive than menthol cigarettes, which have minimised use of the additive due to health concerns (file image)

The findings come days after Donald Trump vowed to outlaw flavoured e-cigarettes to prevent youngsters from taking up vaping. 

US watchdogs have banned the additive in food – but it is be found in e-liquids readily sold in the UK.

Scientists at Duke University in North Carolina found even ‘light use’ – equalling around ten cigarettes a day – put vapers at risk of absorbing more pulegone than the US Food and Drug Administration recommended was safe to consume in food.

England’s chief medical officer last week called the habit ‘a ticking time bomb’. 

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