Mung beans for acne and rice water for great skin: Chinese beauty secrets every woman should follow

Beauty aficionados often spend hundreds on lotions and potions to make themselves look younger.

But luckily China seems to have unlocked the secrets to skincare and youthful looking skin – and most of their tricks don’t break the bank. 

According to Glamour the country is home to some of the most ancient beauty rituals with surprising skincare benefits and many of the ingredients may already be in your kitchen cupboard. 

China seems to have unlocked the secret to skincare and youthful looking skin

China seems to have unlocked the secret to skincare and youthful looking skin

China seems to have unlocked the secret to skincare and youthful looking skin

Mung beans for acne and skincare 

Although mung beans are most known for being used in cakes and noodle dishes they have a variety of other uses.

Not only are they a big part of the Chinese diet, but they’ve also been praised for helping to soothe acne and other skin ailments.

This is achieved not by eating the legumes but by incorporating them into a face mask as they are rich in antioxidants and phytonutrients. 

Face sculpting tools including jade rollers

The jade roller has become a staple in many beauty lover’s skincare routine but not many may know that the tool originated in China in the seventh century.

It is believed that they have healing and protective properties and allegedly boost blood circulation, reduce swelling, and help your skincare products penetrate deeper. 

The increase in circulation can also help smooth out fine lines and wrinkles as well as reduce puffiness and inflammation in the face.

The jade roller has become a staple in many beauty lover's skincare routine but not many may know that the tool originated in China in the seventh century

The jade roller has become a staple in many beauty lover's skincare routine but not many may know that the tool originated in China in the seventh century

The jade roller has become a staple in many beauty lover’s skincare routine but not many may know that the tool originated in China in the seventh century

Cleansing with rice water 

‘It’s not uncommon for both Chinese and Korean women and men to cleanse their faces using rice water, as a tradition passed down from generations before,’ it reads in the publication.

This is because it has the ability to brighten the skin and boost skin firmness while also having anti-inflammatory benefits.  

Drinking green tea 

The Chinese population drinks a lot of herbal tea and as well as helping with internal issues it also has a positive effect on the skin.

According to Yilin Wang, the founder of Chinese skincare brand W=Hb2, there are different types of tea for different skin concerns green teat has remained the most popular.

The tea has anti-inflammatory properties and is full of anti-oxidants.

The Chinese population drinks a lot of herbal tea and as well as helping with internal issues it also has a positive effect on the skin

The Chinese population drinks a lot of herbal tea and as well as helping with internal issues it also has a positive effect on the skin

The Chinese population drinks a lot of herbal tea and as well as helping with internal issues it also has a positive effect on the skin

Consuming He Shou Wu

He Shou Wu is a health boosting herbal blend that is packed with antioxidants and helps to boost immunity.

As well as having health benefits it aids in rejuvenating the skin and thicken tired hair and has been used in traditional Chinese medicine since 800 AD. 

Applying turmeric face masks 

According to Byrdie turmeric face masks have become the go-to DIY mask for many, with its origins in China. 

Wei Brian, beauty guru and the head of the skincare line Wei Beauty, told the publication that Chinese women make these masks to reduce wrinkles and even their skin tone.   

‘Mix one tablespoon of almond milk, one teaspoon of honey, and one teaspoon of turmeric,’ she said.

‘If you want the consistency of your mask to be thicker, you can use yogurt or add a drop more honey, but I like using almond milk because it contains vitamin E and antioxidants.’  

Turmeric face masks have become the go-to DIY mask for many, with its origins in China, and now there are a variety of products on the market that include the ingredient

Turmeric face masks have become the go-to DIY mask for many, with its origins in China, and now there are a variety of products on the market that include the ingredient

Turmeric face masks have become the go-to DIY mask for many, with its origins in China, and now there are a variety of products on the market that include the ingredient

Rice Congee

According to Natural Health Mag this porridge-like dish is often eaten to heal the skin from the inside out.

‘By utilising food as medicine, congee is both nourishing and tonifying as it supports both the spleen and lung,’ the article reads.

‘You may recognise the connection between the lung and skin – many people with asthma also have eczema. Chinese medicine asserts the lungs govern and control the skin.’

It is often thought that the texture and elasticity of the skin can be improved internally by nourishing these organs and improving circulation.   

Facial acupuncture

Facial acupuncture is when a professional uses small dermal needles to carefully place on specific acupuncture points, mostly on and around the face and neck.

As stated in the publication it is widely accepted that it has an abundance of health benefits.

The aim is to increase the nutrient supply which then maximises the collagen, qi and blood.

‘The result: Glowing skin! Facial acupuncture can treat acne, fine lines and wrinkles, scarring, rosacea, psoriasis and eczema,’ it reads.

photo link

(Visited 22 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *