People really DO have a type when it comes to romantic partners, study shows

People looking for love do have a particular ‘type’, research suggests.

While those going through a break-up may be tempted to try something different, it seems that most will end up with someone similar to their previous partner.

A study, published in the journal PNAS, found people tend to date partners with consistent personalities and suggests it may be possible to predict who an individual will couple up with in the future.

People looking for love do have a particular 'type', research suggests. While those going through a break-up may be tempted to try something different, it seems that most will end up with someone similar to their previous partner. Stock image

People looking for love do have a particular 'type', research suggests. While those going through a break-up may be tempted to try something different, it seems that most will end up with someone similar to their previous partner. Stock image

People looking for love do have a particular ‘type’, research suggests. While those going through a break-up may be tempted to try something different, it seems that most will end up with someone similar to their previous partner. Stock image

‘After experiencing a break-up, people commonly believe that they have better ideas about whom they want as a new partner,’ the study authors said.

‘However, the present findings provide evidence that people’s new partners tend to have a degree of similarity to their previous partners, suggesting that people consistently engage in relationships with a particular type of person to at least some extent.’

The researchers, from the University of Toronto in Canada, monitored the relationship status of a group of people in Germany from 2008.

Every time the participants entered a new relationship, the personality traits of their latest partner were assessed.

By 2017, 332 participants had dated two different partners, who had both agreed to complete a personality test.

The researchers found that the current partners of participants described themselves in ways that were similar to their former partners.

However, people who were extrovert or open to experiences were more likely to date someone a bit different.

‘This partner personality consistency can have potential implications for predicting with whom people are likely to couple in the future as well as how they will behave in relationships,’ the study authors said.

More research is needed to understand this pattern, the researchers said, which could be used to create a ‘matching’ algorithm, or improve education around romantic relationships.

WHAT TACTICS DO PEOPLE USE TO STOP THEMSELVES CHEATING?

Researchers at the University of New Brunswick asked 362 heterosexual adults how they had staved off temptations to cheat while in a relationship.

1. ‘Relationship enhancement’ 

Seventy-five per cent of the study’s respondents, who were aged between 19 and 63, selected ‘relationship enhancement’ as their primary tactic.

This ploy included things like taking their partner on a date, making an extra effort with their appearance around them, or having more sex with them.

2. ‘Proactive avoidance’ 

The second most-popular was ‘proactive avoidance’, which involved maintaining distance from the temptation.

As well as physically avoiding the temptation, people also avoided getting close in conversation with that person.

3. ‘Derogation of the temptation’ 

The third and final tactic used by people was ‘derogation of the temptation’, which involved feelings of guilt, and thinking about the tempting person in a negative light.

Participants reported flirting less when they applied the final, ‘derogation of the temptation’ strategy.

But none of the strategies had an effect on the levels of romantic infidelity, sexual infidelity, and whether the relationship survived.

Psychologist Dr Alex Fradera, who was not involved in the research, said the findings show little can be done once feelings of temptation have crept in.

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