Shoppers queue in rain to be first into Tesco’s new store Jack’s

Hundreds of shoppers queued up in the rain as Tesco’s first new Jack’s discount stores opened for business today.

The store in Chatteris, Cambridgeshire, opened its doors to the public first thing this morning alongside a second store in Immingham, north-east Lincolnshire.

The new brand is being widely hailed as a challenger to Aldi and fellow discount store Lidl, which have eaten into the market share of Britain’s so called ‘big four’ supermarkets.

The Chatteris store enjoyed a successful first morning with hundreds pouring through the doors when it opened to the public at 10am. 

By 11am the budget supermarket was overflowing with customers, filling their trollies with food, as well as bargain household items from the When It’s Gone It’s Gone aisle.

Shopper Delia Fernandez, 41, arrived at 3am to be first in line at the Chatteris store, which opened at 10am with a ribbon cutting and a shower of confetti. 

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Tesco has launched its new discount store format called Jack’s as it attempts to take the fight to German discounters Aldi and Lidl

Jack's has certainly proved popular, but how do prices compare with rivals such as Asda, Aldi, Lidl and Sainsbury's?

Jack's has certainly proved popular, but how do prices compare with rivals such as Asda, Aldi, Lidl and Sainsbury's?

Jack’s has certainly proved popular, but how do prices compare with rivals such as Asda, Aldi, Lidl and Sainsbury’s?

The store will also have special buy bins, similar to those seen in Aldi and Lidl, which will be called 'when they're gone, they're gone' bins

The store will also have special buy bins, similar to those seen in Aldi and Lidl, which will be called 'when they're gone, they're gone' bins

The store will also have special buy bins, similar to those seen in Aldi and Lidl, which will be called ‘when they’re gone, they’re gone’ bins

Hundreds of shoppers queued up as Tesco's first new Jack's discount stores opened for business today in Cambridgeshire 

Hundreds of shoppers queued up as Tesco's first new Jack's discount stores opened for business today in Cambridgeshire 

Hundreds of shoppers queued up as Tesco’s first new Jack’s discount stores opened for business today in Cambridgeshire 

Shopper Delia Fernandez (pictured) arrived at 3am to be first in line at the Chatteris store, which opened at 10am with a ribbon cutting and a shower of confetti

Shopper Delia Fernandez (pictured) arrived at 3am to be first in line at the Chatteris store, which opened at 10am with a ribbon cutting and a shower of confetti

Shopper Delia Fernandez (pictured) arrived at 3am to be first in line at the Chatteris store, which opened at 10am with a ribbon cutting and a shower of confetti

First customer Lee Fuller shows off his bill. The vast majority of Jack's products will be own brand, as Tesco looks to take the fight to budget behemoths Lidl and Aldi

First customer Lee Fuller shows off his bill. The vast majority of Jack's products will be own brand, as Tesco looks to take the fight to budget behemoths Lidl and Aldi

First customer Lee Fuller shows off his bill. The vast majority of Jack’s products will be own brand, as Tesco looks to take the fight to budget behemoths Lidl and Aldi

Jack’s versus the rest: How does the new budget store compare with Lidl, Aldi and the other big supermarkets?

Tesco has unveiled its new Jack’s discount store in Chatteris, Cambridgeshire. 

Here is how a selection of the shelf ticket prices compare with those at the Chatteris branch of Aldi, less than a mile away (cheapest price in green):

Milk

Jack’s British semi-skimmed milk, 4 pints – £1.09

Aldi Cowbelle semi-skimmed milk, 4 pints – £1.09 

Tesco British semi-skimmed milk, 4 pints – £1.09  

Asda British semi-skimmed milk, 4 pints – £1.09

Sainsbury’s British semi-skimmed milk, 4 pints – £1.10 

Lidl British semi-skimmed milk, 4 pints – £1.09 

Cereal

Jack’s Cornflakes Cereal, 500g – 55p 

Aldi Harvest Morn Cornflakes, 500g   – 72p 

Tesco Cornflakes, 500g – 55p 

Asda Smart-Price Cornflakes, 500g – 45p

Sainsbury’s Basics Cornflakes, 500g – 45p

Lidl Crownfield Cornflakes, 500g – 72p

Pasta 

Jack’s Spaghetti, 500g – 45p 

Aldi Cucina Italian Spaghetti, 500g  – 39p

Tesco Quick Cook Spaghetti, 500g – 50p

Asda Spaghetti, 500g – 45p

Sainsbury’s own-brand Spaghetti – 55p

Lidl Baresi Spaghetti, 500g – 45p 

Tea

Jack’s 80 Tea Bags – 85p

Aldi Diplomat Gold Label 80 Tea Bags – £1.09

Tesco 80 Tea Bags – £1.10

Asda Everyday 80 Tea Bags – £1.00

Sainsbury’s Taste The Difference 80 Tea Bags – £2.00 

Lidl Knightsbridge Gold Blend 80 Tea Bags – £1.09

Bread 

Jack’s British Medium White Sliced Bread – 45p

Aldi Village Bakery Sliced Medium White – 49p

Tesco Medium White Sliced Bread – 55p

Asda Baker’s Selection White Medium Bread – 55p 

Sainsbury’s Soft Medium White Sliced Bread – 55p

Lidl Rowan Hill Bakery Soft Sliced Bread – 49p 

Baked Beans 

Jack’s Baked Beans in Tomato Sauce, 4x 420g – 90p

Aldi Corale Premium Baked Beans, 4x 425g – 98p 

Tesco Baked Beans in Tomato Sauce, 4x420g – £1 

Asda Baked Beans in Tomato Sauce, 4x420g – 98p

Sainsbury’s Baked Beans, 4x420g – £1.00

Lidl Baked Beans in Tomato Sauce, 4x420g – £1.00

Turkey Breast Mince 

Jack’s 2% fat, 500g – £3.35  

Aldi – N/A

Tesco 2% fat 500g – £4.00

Asda 2% fat 500g – £3.29

Sainsbury’s 2% fat, 500g – £4.00 

Lidl 2% fat, 500g – £3.19

Apple Juice 

Jack’s own-brand Apple Juice, 1 litre – 95p

Aldi Fresh Apple Juice, 1 litre – 89p

Tesco Pure Apple Juice, 1 litre – 80p

Asda Apple Juice, 1 litre – £1.00

Sainsbury’s Pure Apple Juice, 1 litre – 90p

Lidl Vitafit Apple Juice, 1 litre – 99p

‘I wanted to see the different bargains that they’ve got and to have a good look,’ she said.

‘There is so much stuff in the middle isle bargain bins that I will be coming back to get. There are some real steals in there. My backpack was only £5 and I think that is really good and great value.’

Emily Tyas, 32, from Chatteris, who works as a school supervisor, said: ‘I bought a whole load of fresh bakery goods that were so well priced and seem to be great quality.

‘I also bought an iron. I would say that the prices are round about on par with Lidl and Aldi. I liked the look of the bargain bins. There are so many little goodies that I will be coming to get for the kids at Christmas.’

Lee Fuller, 36 who works for a recycling company, was the first customer through the tills. He said: ‘I just thought I would stop by this morning to see what it was all about.

‘I didn’t think I would be the first customer to buy something.The shop looks pretty good inside. I did not expect it to be so visually pleasing but it looks very nice inside. I picked up a few household goods and a TV.’

Tesco chief executive Dave Lewis denied that the British-made emphasis at Jack’s has anything to do with Brexit, adding that it’s ‘what customers want’ and the plan was formulated pre-Brexit

Tesco said that eight out of 10 Jack’s food and drink products will be ‘grown, reared or made’ in Britain and stores will stock an own brand range, also branded Jack’s

Up to 15 stores will open over the next year, with five existing Tesco properties being repurposed and the remainder being new outlets

Jack’s will offer named brand items along with hundreds of own-brand products, with baked beans costing just 29p a tin

Retired mechanic Mark Burton, 48, of Chatteris, said: ‘It’s more competition, bringing in better prices for the town.’

Up to 15 of the stores, named after Tesco founder Jack Cohen, will open over the next year.

Most products will be Jack’s own brand and the chain will have 2,600 lines.

Retired builder William McPherson, 72, of Chatteris, said: ‘There’s a good selection of goods there.’

He added prices were ‘comparable with Aldi’ and he liked the layout – ‘there’s plenty of room so you’re not crammed up’.

The launch of Jack’s is part of Tesco’s centenary celebrations which will see the business mark 100 years in 2019.

Jack Cohen founded Tesco 99 years ago in 1919. 

Tesco hope that Jack's will take on German duo Aldi and Lidl, which have eaten up their market share by offering products at knock down prices

Tesco hope that Jack's will take on German duo Aldi and Lidl, which have eaten up their market share by offering products at knock down prices

Tesco hope that Jack’s will take on German duo Aldi and Lidl, which have eaten up their market share by offering products at knock down prices

Tesco chief executive Dave Lewis is pictured posing at a checkout till at the new Jack's store in Chatteris, Cambridgeshire

Tesco chief executive Dave Lewis is pictured posing at a checkout till at the new Jack's store in Chatteris, Cambridgeshire

Tesco chief executive Dave Lewis is pictured posing at a checkout till at the new Jack’s store in Chatteris, Cambridgeshire

That added to the protection when it finally registered in the UK last December and the EU in April using an obscure subsidiary known as PTLL.

But a delay in the EU application process appears to have led to a slip-up over dates.

Sarah Redmond, trademark director at Fox Williams, said: ‘Their logo is still open to objections for another month so further oppositions could be filed against this application.’

More than 15 complaints have already been registered in both the UK and the EU against the name and, separately, the brand’s red logo.

Lawyers said anyone who thinks the new logo is similar to their own has until October 17 to file a complaint at the EU’s Intellectual Property Office.

It means the discount chain will be trading for four weeks during which the legal position over its trademark will be wide open to new complaints – which one trademark source described as ‘absolute madness’. 

The launch of Jack's is part of Tesco's centenary celebrations which will see the business mark 100 years in 2019. Jack Cohen founded Tesco 99 years ago in 1919

The launch of Jack's is part of Tesco's centenary celebrations which will see the business mark 100 years in 2019. Jack Cohen founded Tesco 99 years ago in 1919

The launch of Jack’s is part of Tesco’s centenary celebrations which will see the business mark 100 years in 2019. Jack Cohen founded Tesco 99 years ago in 1919

The store will look to offer less choice for smaller prices, as shoppers increasingly favour convenience stores rather than the large-format supermarkets

The store will look to offer less choice for smaller prices, as shoppers increasingly favour convenience stores rather than the large-format supermarkets

The store will look to offer less choice for smaller prices, as shoppers increasingly favour convenience stores rather than the large-format supermarkets

Who was Tesco founder Jack Cohen? The pioneer of ‘pile it high and sell it cheap’

Tesco traces its roots back to 1919, when 20-year-old Jack Cohen began selling groceries from a stall in London’s East End.

Born in 1898, Cohen grew up in Whitechapel, east London, the child of Jewish parents.

He began his working life as an apprentice tailor to his father but the pair eventually became estranged after Cohen informed him of his wish to begin a career as a grocer.

In 1917, he volunteered to join the Royal Flying Corps where his tailoring skills were employed by senior officers to make balloons and other aircraft.

After a military career that saw him serve in Egypt, Palestine and France, he was eventually demobilised in 1919 after contracting malaria and returned to England.

Upon returning after the First World War, he was reluctant to continue his work as a tailor, and set up a marker stall in Hackney purchasing surplus NAAFI (Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes) stock with his £30 demob money.

He soon owned a number of stalls and set up a wholesale business.

He came up with the Tesco name in 1924 after buying a shipment of tea to start selling his first own-label products. 

Cohen used the initials from the tea supplier TE Stockwell and combined them with ‘Co’ from his surname, creating the soon-to-be famous brand name of ‘TESCo’.

After marrying Sarah ‘Cissie’ Fox in the same year, he opened the first Tesco in Edgware in 1929 and by 1939 owned 100 stores.

Father-of-two Cohen, knighted in 1969, became known for his motto ‘pile it high and sell it cheap’. He died aged 80 in 1979.

After marrying Sarah 'Cissie' Fox (pictured), Cohen opened the first Tesco in Edgware in 1929 and by 1939 he would own 100 stores

After marrying Sarah 'Cissie' Fox (pictured), Cohen opened the first Tesco in Edgware in 1929 and by 1939 he would own 100 stores

After marrying Sarah ‘Cissie’ Fox (pictured), Cohen opened the first Tesco in Edgware in 1929 and by 1939 he would own 100 stores

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