Terrorist who gloated that the Westminster attack was ‘decree of Allah’ jailed for 19 months

Asma Aweys, from Edmonton, north London, shared ISIS material in a family WhatsApp group. She claimed the Westminster terror attack was 'the decree of Allah'

Asma Aweys, from Edmonton, north London, shared ISIS material in a family WhatsApp group. She claimed the Westminster terror attack was 'the decree of Allah'

Asma Aweys, from Edmonton, north London, shared ISIS material in a family WhatsApp group. She claimed the Westminster terror attack was ‘the decree of Allah’

A terrorist who gloated that the Westminster attack was ‘the decree of Allah’ claimed she did not realise her messages could get her into trouble.

Asma Aweys, 30, had copies of the jihadi magazine ‘Rumayah’ with advice about how to make napalm and Molotov cocktails as well as an article about the ‘perfect knife’ for murder.

While discussing the Westminster incident in 2017, which left four dead, she said: ‘This was by the decree of Allah.’

Messages discussing the terror attack at the Manchester Arena were also found on her phone, including one which read: ‘It was the shaytaan [Arabic word for devil] Ariana Grande‘s concert.’

Aweys, from Edmonton, north London, was jailed for 19 months today alongside her brother and husband, who shared sickening messages in a family WhatsApp group.

The judge jailed Ahmed Aweys for 25 months and Asma’s husband Abdulaziz Abu Munye for 15 months, after all three pleaded guilty. 

Two of Aweys brothers Wail and Suleyman, one of whom had a place at university, had travelled to Syria in early 2015 and are believed to have died in the fighting a few months later. 

The Old Bailey heard that the family downloaded and shared ISIS material while bragging: ‘We are embedded in their societies, we are the enemy within.’ 

The family tried to claim that they were simply trying to work out what had happened to their missing siblings, but the judge, Mark Dennis QC, dismissed their mitigation. 

Rhiannon Crimmins, defending Asma Aweys said: ‘It was simply something she did to some extent to allay some frustration.

‘Within the WhatsApp conversation there are significant lengthy conversations about the two brothers who are missing.

‘For Ms Aweys the most significant aspect is that her youngest child was 15 months old when she was taken into custody.

‘At the time she did not realise that her comments and downloading documents could get her into so much trouble.’

But Mark Dennis QC said the family ‘male and female alike’ had shared material ‘sympathetic to violent extremism’ and added that their messages ‘speak volumes’.

Police discovered the family of terrorists, two of which travelled to Syria to fight in 2015, after Asma's brother Ahmed (pictured) began planning a robbery in Ilford

Police discovered the family of terrorists, two of which travelled to Syria to fight in 2015, after Asma's brother Ahmed (pictured) began planning a robbery in Ilford

Police discovered the family of terrorists, two of which travelled to Syria to fight in 2015, after Asma’s brother Ahmed (pictured) began planning a robbery in Ilford

Asma Aweys and Munye lived in the same street in Edmonton as the family of radical preacher Omar Bakri Mohammad, who was banned from Britain in the wake of the 7/7 bombings.

Munye, who teaches Arabic and works part-time as a graphic designer, married Asma Aweys in 2014 and they have two young boys aged one and three, who are now the subject of a social services care order.

The family’s extremist views were revealed after a tip off that Ahmed Aweys and his two half-brothers were planning to break into a Muslim-run jewellery shop in Ilford Lane, east London.

They were caught red-handed and during searches of their homes police also found £60,000 in cash and £10,000 in gold.

Messages found on their phones showed Ahmed Aweys discussing fraud with his brother-in-law Abdulaziz Abu Munye, a former street robber, and telling him he was entitled to take from the ‘kuffr’ [infidels].

As part of Operation Be Pretty 2, police discovered that the family, who are of Somali origin, were sharing ISIS propaganda and messages of support in a family Whatsapp group.

Prosecutors said some other members of the family appeared to be of ‘like mind-set’ and either actively supported or were at least ‘quiet in response’ to extremist chat.

Ahmed and Asma Aweys shared links to sermons by the al-Qaeda preacher Anwar al-Awlaki and talked about bringing up children in the paths of their uncles Wail and Suleyman, known as Sola.

The uncles appear to have been killed in fighting in August 2015 when Ahmed Aweys told ‘Biza’ – Munye’s nickname – that Allah had chosen them to be part of ‘blessed events’.

Ahmed Aweys said that he wanted to become ‘hafidh’ [protectors of the Koran] and be like Sola and Wail.

In one chat, Ahmed Aweys said: ‘The biggest advantage that we have is we are embedded in their societies, we are the enemy within and they know not.’ 

Two months later, Ahmed Aweys left a voice message saying a war between Muslims and disbelievers had begun.

And when Munye sent Ahmed Aweys a link to a report on Isis fighting, Ahmed replied: ‘Breathtaking…mashing up pagans.’

Munye asked about Hayat Tahrir al-Sham, al-Qaeda’s affiliate in Syria and Ahmed Aweys told him they were ‘pants as they don’t believe in fighting gaalada [infidels].’

Ahmed Aweys pleaded guilty to using WhatsApp to distribute the ISIS online magazine Dabiq and the video Flames of War 2 to Mohammed Abu, his half-brother who was involved in the robbery plot.

Flames of War 2 is a film released by the media wing of ISIS in 2017 in both Arabic and English.

‘It shows brutal executions of various kinds, battle footage, references to attacks in the West and praising the faith-based nature of the participants,’ Lee Ingham, prosecuting, said.

‘There are computer generated scenes of rockets heading towards the US.’

Asma's husband, Abdulaziz Abu Munye, Flames of War 2, 

Asma's husband, Abdulaziz Abu Munye, Flames of War 2, 

Asma’s husband, Abdulaziz Abu Munye, Flames of War 2, 

The 58-minute video, released by al-Hayat Media, the media wing of ISIS, on November 29, 2017 in Arabic and English and showed ‘brutal executions of various kinds, battle footage, and made references to attacks in the West,’ Lee Ingham, prosecuting said.

After sending it, Aweys commented: ‘Bowling with kafir heads…lol’.

He had also sent a video to his sister, Asma, called ‘Inside the Khilafah’ [Islamic State], Edition 7, which was released by ISIS on February 7, 2018.

The video featured an ‘injured person shown being stamped on and a dead body being dragged along,’ Mr Ingham said. ‘Along with combat scenes including women fighters wearing a niqab and carrying firearms in a truck with the Daesh [ISIS] flag.’

‘There is reference to a ‘campaign of conquest’ with a map of the Euphrates,’ he added. ‘With scenes of celebrations of victory, including an open top vehicle with men carrying a decapitated head and another vehicle dragging a dead body by a rope.’

After sending the video via WhatsApp to his wife, his sister, Asma, and his other sisters, Ahmed Aweys added: ‘AllahuAkbar! [god is great].’

Munye pleaded guilty to using WhatsApp to send Flames of War 2 to Aweys on November 29 2017, the same day he sent it on to Mohammed Abu.

Asma Aweys was accused of downloading the ISIS magazine, Rumiyah, editions 3, 4, and 5.

Issue three featured guidance on how to conduct vehicle attacks, issue four had a step by step guide to knife attacks, and issue five had instructions on how to make Molotov cocktails and napalm.

Edition three advised readers to ‘inflict misery and destruction upon the enemies of Allah’ and said the ‘objective can be to kill a large number of people or to disrupt financial stability of a country, both aimed at terrorising the enemies of Allah.’

Two months after the attempted robbery, a sister, Hafsa Aweys, was stopped trying to leave the country with children from the family, including a child of Ahmed Aweys, using someone else’s passport to get to Morocco.

Ahmed Aweys, of Ilfracombe Gardens, Chadwell Heath, east London, admitted three counts of dissemination of a terrorist publication, and given a community sentence for his part in the attempted robbery.

Munye, of Streamside Close, Edmonton, north London, admitted one count of dissemination of a terrorist publication.

Asma Aweys, from Edmonton, north London, admitted collecting three copies of an IS magazine in November and December 2016 and January 2017.

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