Thai cave boys will make £72,000 EACH from new Netflix show about their 17-day ordeal

The Thai cave boys will make £72,000 from a big budget Netflix show about their 17-day ordeal trapped underground.

Netflix announced their deal on Tuesday after months of negotiations with the Thai dictatorship’s Culture Ministry.

The figures announced for the families of the 12 boys, as well as their football coach, did not reveal what the Thai government would be taking from the streaming giant.

The producers of the dramatisation said they would also give money to organisations involved in the rescue effort.

Members of the Thai Wild Boards football team and their coach Ekapol Chantawong (Top center) pose for photos during a press conference to announce the 'Thai Cave Rescue Series Contract Exchange Ceremony' with Netflix in Bangkok on Tuesday

Members of the Thai Wild Boards football team and their coach Ekapol Chantawong (Top center) pose for photos during a press conference to announce the 'Thai Cave Rescue Series Contract Exchange Ceremony' with Netflix in Bangkok on Tuesday

Members of the Thai Wild Boards football team and their coach Ekapol Chantawong (Top center) pose for photos during a press conference to announce the ‘Thai Cave Rescue Series Contract Exchange Ceremony’ with Netflix in Bangkok on Tuesday

Wild Boars football team coach Ekkapol Chantawong gives a speech during the press conference

Wild Boars football team coach Ekkapol Chantawong gives a speech during the press conference

Wild Boars football team coach Ekkapol Chantawong gives a speech during the press conference

Members of the Wild Boars football team watch on as they attend the press conference

Members of the Wild Boars football team watch on as they attend the press conference

Members of the Wild Boars football team watch on as they attend the press conference

The Wild Boars soccer team, aged between 11 and 16, and their 25-year-old coach, became trapped last June while exploring caves in Chiang Rai province.

Netflix is joining with the production company for the movie ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ to make the film. 

Thailand’s Culture Ministry first unveiled the deal in March when they announced it as a miniseries.

Deputy government spokesman Weerachon Sukoondhapatipakat was quoted then as saying that the families of the cave survivors would each be paid 3 million baht (£72,000).

A date for the project to be released was not disclosed.

The boys of the Wild Boars soccer team were found by two British divers and brought out by an international crew of experienced cave divers who teamed up with Thai navy SEALs in a dangerously complicated mission that was successfully concluded on July 10.

Members of the soccer team who were rescued last July after 17 days in the cave sit and watch the press conference

Members of the soccer team who were rescued last July after 17 days in the cave sit and watch the press conference

Members of the soccer team who were rescued last July after 17 days in the cave sit and watch the press conference

Team coach Ekapol Chantawong (left) talks with Spokesperson of the Committee for Tham Luang Cave Mission Lt General Werachon Sukondhapatipak

Team coach Ekapol Chantawong (left) talks with Spokesperson of the Committee for Tham Luang Cave Mission Lt General Werachon Sukondhapatipak

Team coach Ekapol Chantawong (left) talks with Spokesperson of the Committee for Tham Luang Cave Mission Lt General Werachon Sukondhapatipak

President of International Productions for SK Global Entertainment Michael Hogan (left), Director of International Originals for Netflix Erika North (second from left), team coach Ekapol Chantawong (second from right), and Spokesperson of the Committee for Tham Luang Cave Mission Lt General Werachon Sukondhapatipak

President of International Productions for SK Global Entertainment Michael Hogan (left), Director of International Originals for Netflix Erika North (second from left), team coach Ekapol Chantawong (second from right), and Spokesperson of the Committee for Tham Luang Cave Mission Lt General Werachon Sukondhapatipak

President of International Productions for SK Global Entertainment Michael Hogan (left), Director of International Originals for Netflix Erika North (second from left), team coach Ekapol Chantawong (second from right), and Spokesperson of the Committee for Tham Luang Cave Mission Lt General Werachon Sukondhapatipak

‘We are grateful for the opportunity to thank the people and organizations from Thailand and around the world who came together to perform a true miracle, by retelling our story,’ said Ekapol ‘Ake’ Chanthawong, the boy’s assistant coach who shared the ordeal with them.

‘We look forward to working with all involved parties to ensure our story is told accurately, so that the world can recognize, once again, the heroes that made the rescue operation a success.’

Tuesday’s announcement said 13 Thumluang ‘has committed to donating 15% of the revenues derived from bringing this story to global audiences to charity organizations that focus on disaster relief.’

Jon M. Chu, who helmed ‘Crazy Rich Asians,’ and Nattawut ‘Baz’ Poonpiriya, a Thai filmmaker, will be directors on the cave project.

‘We are immensely proud to be able to support the retelling of the incredible story of the Tham Luang cave rescue,’ Erika North, director of International Originals at Netflix, said in a statement.

Members of the 'Wild Boars' football team pose with coach Ekkapol Chantawong (centre)

Members of the 'Wild Boars' football team pose with coach Ekkapol Chantawong (centre)

Members of the ‘Wild Boars’ football team pose with coach Ekkapol Chantawong (centre)

Members of Thailand's Wild Boars football team sitting watching the press conference

Members of Thailand's Wild Boars football team sitting watching the press conference

Members of Thailand’s Wild Boars football team sitting watching the press conference

‘The story combines so many unique local and universal themes which connected people from all walks of life, from all around the world.

‘Thailand is a very important country for Netflix and we are looking forward to bringing this inspiring local but globally resonant story of overcoming seemingly insurmountable odds to life, once again, for global audiences.’

The rescue was a rare bit of feel-good news from Thailand, which has been mired in political conflict and heavy-handed military rule for more than a decade.

The cave rescue also allowed the government of Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha, who had seized power in a 2014 military coup, to share in some glory.

An independent film about the adventure, ‘The Cave,’ was shot soon after the rescue and is supposed to be released later this year.

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