The Two Princes Paid Tribute To The Fallen With Touching Speeches For D-Day

D-Day was the largest seaborne invasion in history. Today marks the 75th anniversary.

The assault on the beaches of Normandy by British, American, and Canadian troops who would eventually fight their way across Europe has gone down in history as a watershed event.

The codenames of where the troops landed — Omaha and Utah for the Americans, Gold and Sword for the British, and Juno for the Canadians — remain familiar today.

“God almighty, in a few short hours we will be in battle with the enemy. We do not join battle afraid. We do not ask favors or indulgence but ask that, if You will, use us as Your instrument for the right and an aid in returning peace to the world.” – – Lt. Col Robert L. Wolverton, commanding officer of 3rd battalion, 506th PIR.

The Duke of Cambridge attended a service of commemoration at the National Memorial Arboretum, marking the 75th anniversary of the Normandy landings earlier today.

Prince William is joining more than 20 D-Day veterans at a public service in Heroes’ Square, before paying his respects at the Normandy Campaign Memorial. In a heartfelt moment, the Duke of Cambridge delivered the same D-Day address his great-grandfather King George VI made in 1944 to recognise the great sacrifice made in wartime.

“Now once more a supreme test has to be faced.

“This time the challenge is not to fight to survive but to fight to win the final victory for the good cause.

“At this historic moment surely not one of us is too busy, too young, or too old to play a part in a nationwide, perchance a world-wide vigil of prayer as the great crusade sets forth.”

On his wreath of poppies Prince William wrote: “In memory of all those who have made the ultimate sacrifice. We will remember them. William.”

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Prince Harry is also paying his respects to veterans.

The 34-year-old royal stepped out solo to London’s Royal Hospital Chelsea this morning, a retirement and nursing home for some 300 veterans of the British Army, to honour Chelsea pensioners as part of D-Day commemorations.Taking part in their annual Founder’s Day Parade. Six veterans from the Normandy Landings also took part. Prince Harry wore his uniform for the important event.

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The new dad was his usual jovial self, making jokes with the elderly servicemen and women.

When asked who is favourite was, Harry gestured to staff from the Chelsea Hospital’s infirmary and they erupted into hysterics.

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As part of the event to mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day, Harry is helping to make poppies alongside the veterans.

Founder’s Day is also known as Oak Apple Day, referring to the oak tree that King Charles hid in to avoid being captured by Parliamentary forces after the Battle of Worcester in 1651.

In his speech Prince Harry said: “Now I stand here before you to not only acknowledge the incredible contribution you have made to this nation but to acknowledge that you, my friends, are also seriously good fun to be around!”

We should all be incredibly proud and grateful knowing that 46 of you here fought in the Second World War… I thank you for inviting me here today and I wish you all the health and happiness you so richly deserve.

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