USS Connecticut submarine in collision with mystery underwater object leaving several sailors injured en route to Guam

A nuclear submarine “struck an object” while submerged in the Indo-Pacific on the afternoon of October 2, wounding several sailors, the Navy confirmed.

The USS Connecticut fast-attack submarine was heading to Guam at the time of the collision.

A US nuclear propelled submarine “struck an object” while submerged in the Indo-Pacific on the afternoon of October 2, wounding several sailors, the Navy confirmed.

BUMPS AND BRUISES

“The safety of the crew remains the Navy’s top priority,” an official statement reads. “There are no life threatening injuries.”

There were two crew members who suffered moderate bumps, bruises and lacerations, but nobody of the 140 crew, made up of 14 Officers and 126 enlisted sailors, required to be evacuated.

It added that the integrity of the nuclear-propelled ship and its operational capacity weren’t compromised as a probe has been launched by the US Pacific Fleet and the Naval Safety Center. 

“The submarine remains in a safe and stable condition,” the Navy stated. 

“USS Connecticut’s nuclear propulsion plant and spaces were not affected and remain fully operational. 

“The extent of damage to the remainder of the submarine is being assessed.” 

MYSTERY COLLISION

The sea service did not detail any specifics about the object that the USS Connecticut struck. 

However, the submarine’s assessment of the area’s topography at the point of impact ruled out that there was a land mass in the path of the vessel, an unnamed official told Navy Times.

The publication noted that it stalled reporting on the submarine incident until USS Connecticut and its sailors were safely in Guam’s port.

‘NOT HOSTILE’… SO FAR

The official stressed to the Navy Times that so far, preliminary information on what happened during the mishap did not indicate anything hostile or suggest the incident involved another ship. 

The sub, which is armed with Tomahawk missiles, MK48 torpedoes, eight torpedo tubes, left Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton, Washington, for deployment in May.

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