Video shows pus leaking out of a huge tonsil abscess

A stomach-churning video shows the moment a doctor drains a huge abscess in a woman’s throat.

The growth on the patient’s tonsil is prodded and grabbed with a pair of tweezers before being sliced with what appears to be a hot wire.

As the large abscess is cut open, pus oozes out and into the patient’s mouth as the doctor continues to cut chunks off the red lump.

The pus is swabbed away with a cotton bud and eventually the entire abscess is sliced off and removed, leaving just a section of damaged tissue where it was attached.

The doctor who performed the procedure said antibiotics had failed to get rid of the infection causing the abscess, but it had healed within a week after the surgery.

Dr Rahmat Omar, from Kuala Lumpur, performed the operation using what appears to be electrocautery, in which a hot wire is used instead of a knife or scalpel to slice human tissue

Dr Rahmat Omar, from Kuala Lumpur, performed the operation using what appears to be electrocautery, in which a hot wire is used instead of a knife or scalpel to slice human tissue

Dr Rahmat Omar, from Kuala Lumpur, performed the operation using what appears to be electrocautery, in which a hot wire is used instead of a knife or scalpel to slice human tissue

The patient in Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia needed the surgery to remove a tonsil abscess on the right-hand side of her mouth.

Tonsil abscesses are a common infection in adults and are usually caused by bacteria in the throat.

Symptoms of an abscess can include pain in the throat, a fever and lockjaw.

They can be treated using antibiotics but, because abscesses are filled with pus and can grow to be large, the flesh and fluid must also be removed from the throat.

This video shows 49-year-old surgeon Rahmat Omar removing an abscess from one of his patients.

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He appears to using electrocautery, in which an extremely hot wire is used to slice through tissue – as he cuts the flesh, steam or smoke passes over the front of the camera.

When the abscess is first punctured, pus leaks out into the patient's mouth and has to be swabbed up with a cotton bud – removing the pus and extra flesh is a key part of treating an abscess, even if antibiotics successfully clear up the infection which caused it

When the abscess is first punctured, pus leaks out into the patient's mouth and has to be swabbed up with a cotton bud – removing the pus and extra flesh is a key part of treating an abscess, even if antibiotics successfully clear up the infection which caused it

When the abscess is first punctured, pus leaks out into the patient’s mouth and has to be swabbed up with a cotton bud – removing the pus and extra flesh is a key part of treating an abscess, even if antibiotics successfully clear up the infection which caused it

At the end of the video the patient is left with just a patch of damaged skin where the abscess was before, and Mr Oman, the surgeon, said the wound had healed completely within a week

At the end of the video the patient is left with just a patch of damaged skin where the abscess was before, and Mr Oman, the surgeon, said the wound had healed completely within a week

At the end of the video the patient is left with just a patch of damaged skin where the abscess was before, and Mr Oman, the surgeon, said the wound had healed completely within a week

When the abscess is first damaged, pus leaks out and has to be mopped up with a cotton bud but then the op is a case of slicing away the excess tissue. 

By the end of the procedure just a patch of damaged flesh is left and the lump has been completely removed.

After a course of injected antibiotics and painkillers the patient’s condition had cleared up completely within a week.

Mr Omar said: ‘The video shows the incision and drainage of right tonsil abscess.

‘Initial oral antibiotic therapy has failed and she became febrile and unwell.

‘Incision and drainage with biopsy of the protruding right tonsil was performed and the patient was placed on an intravenous antibiotic with pain relief medications.

‘The lesion recovered fully after one week.’ 

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