What is a no confidence vote and how many MPs need to support it to topple the government?

PRIME Minister Theresa May is facing yet another vote of no confidence – this time from MPs.

But what is a vote of no confidence, and how is this one different from the one she faced in early December? Find out here.

The PM has emerged unscathed from a vote of no confidence – but vows to carry on
Getty – Pool

What is a motion of no confidence?

There are two kinds, and neither are the least bit palatable for a sitting PM.

One involves a motion of no confidence being moved in the House of Commons with the wording “that this House has no confidence in HM Government”.

The backing of a majority of MPs would topple the Government.

The other kind – which occurred within the Tory Party on December 12 – saw Tory MPs write to the chairman of the backbench 1922 Committee expressing no confidence.

The required 48 MPs wrote letters expressing their desire for a vote of no confidence to the backbench 1922 Committee, triggering an anonymous ballot to decide their leader’s fate.

Dozens of MPs submitted formal letters to trigger a leadership challenge against Mrs May

How many MPs need to support it to topple the government?

If the vote is backed by a simple majority of MPs, the government will be toppled.

If a new Government with the support of the Commons cannot be formed within 14 days, an early general election is called.

It is one of only two ways in which an early general election may be triggered under the terms of the Fixed Term Parliaments Act 2011.

The other kind – which occurred within the Tory Party on December 12 – saw Tory MPs write to the chairman of the backbench 1922 Committee expressing no confidence.

Will Theresa May stay in power?

Yes – for now at least.

A critical proportion of Tory MPs – 15 per cent – filed letters expressing no confidence in Mrs May’s leadership after she pulled a doomed-to-fail vote on her Brexit deal from Parliament.

But a resulting vote on her leadership on December 12, 2018 – the first in nearly 40 years – proved not to be the end of her political career.

May secured 200 votes from Tory MPs, giving her an 83 vote majority.

If Parliament votes against May’s Brexit deal on Tuesday January 15, the Labour Party leader has threatened to trigger an general election.

Who has tabled a no-confidence vote now?

Opposition parties have piled fresh pressure on Jeremy Corbyn by formally tabling a no confidence vote in the Government.
The Labour leader was under attack by all parties on December 18, 2018 after he chickened out of his bid to unseat Mrs May.

In retaliation, MPs from the SNP, Lib Dems, Plaid Cymru and the Greens launched their own bid to bring down the Government.

In January, Corbyn said he will call a no-confidence motion in Theresa May’s government “soon”.

He said while on the BBC One’s The Andrew Marr Show: “We will table a motion of no confidence in the government at a time of our choosing, but it’s going to be soon, don’t worry about that.

“We will table a motion of no confidence in the government at a time of our choosing, but it’s going to be soon, don’t worry about that.”

Only a no confidence motion tabled by the official leader of the opposition automatically gets allotted time for debate and a vote in the Commons.

It is up to the Government to decide whether to grant the motion from the smaller opposition parties any time – which is highly unlikely.

If the PM was to lose a vote of no confidence in the Commons it would trigger a General Election.

Labour’s Barry Gardiner confirmed that his party could table a vote of no confidence if Mrs May’s deal does not make it through Parliament on the 15th January.

Link

(Visited 18 times, 1 visits today)

One comment

  1. Ηello friends, Mammoth ivory was found in trinkets sold on the Cambodian market.

    A team of Scottish researchers has discovered woolly mammoth ivory in ivory objects from Asian and African elephants from Cambodia, the Royal Scottish Zoological Society (RZSS) announced Friday. The animal’s DNA, extinguished for around 10,000 years, was detected in trinkets by scientists at the WildGenes laboratory, based at the Edinburgh Zoo. The trinkets, for sale on the Cambodian market, had been sent to Scotland for analysis.

    The WildGenes program team is studying DNA in ivory to trace its origin and combat poaching and ivory trafficking. “We were surprised to find woolly mammoth ivory trinkets in circulation, especially so early in our tests and in a tropical country like Cambodia,” said WildGenes Program Director Dr. Alex Ball, quoted on the site of the Zoological Society.

Leave a Reply