Why do the clocks change, will we stop changing them back and forward and why do we use GMT?

CLOCKS throughout the UK are set to change for the second and last time of 2018 this weekend.

As Brits brace themselves to officially welcome the winter season, we give you the lowdown on future changes.

Clocks are set to go back on October 28 2018
Clocks are set to go back on October 28 2018
Getty – Contributor

Why do the clocks change?

We change are clocks to make better use of the daylight.

On the last Sunday in March, British clocks go forward an hour so there’s more daylight in the evenings.

But the clocks go back in October, so there’s more daylight in the mornings and less in the evenings.

Will we stop changing them back and forward?

Europe may stop changing its clocks back at the same time as the UK at the end of this year.

Current rules mean every state has to switch to summer time on the last Sunday of March and switch back to winter time on the last Sunday of October.

But the European Commission proposals would end the practice.

This would mean EU countries would have to choose to adopt permanent summer or winter time and potentially see Belfast having to decide whether to align itself with clocks in the Republic or the rest of the UK.

Why do we use GMT?

On October 22 1884 the Royal Observatory at Greenwich, London was announced as the site of the Universal Time meridian of longitude.

This meant Greenwich Mean Time became an international standard time reference point.

All the world’s time zones are calculated from this point and all terrestrial longitudes.

GMT remains constant throughout the year. In the winter, the UK uses GMT for its local time, but in March, local time is moved forward an hour to British Summer Time (BST).

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