Woman suffered collapsed lung and broken ribs after being attacked by a six-foot-tall grey kangaroo

A woman who suffered broken ribs and internal injuries when she was viciously mauled by a giant kangaroo has pleaded for the wild animal not to be killed.

Linda Smith, 64, was attacked by the boomer at her Darling Downs property in southern Queensland Saturday, saved by her son who beat the animal with a shovel.

Mrs Smith initially came to the rescue of her husband, Jim, who had been outside feeding the dozens of kangaroos as they normally did each night, until one turned on him, news.com.au reported.

‘This one kangaroo came in and I thought it was Golly Gosh, one of the kangaroos we have raised. He was a huge grey, would have been at least six foot,’ Mrs Smith said.

Linda Smith (pictured), 64, was attacked by the boomer at her Darling Downs property in southern Queensland Saturday, saved by her son who beat the animal with a shovel

Linda Smith (pictured), 64, was attacked by the boomer at her Darling Downs property in southern Queensland Saturday, saved by her son who beat the animal with a shovel

‘Jim was on the ground and the kangaroo just kept at him. I went outside to try and help him and took a broom and a piece of bread, but he knocked the broom out of my hand then attacked me.’

She the got her hands on a piece of wood to smack the kangaroo away, before her son delivered it two powerful blows to its head with a shovel.

The buck retreated to the bush allowing the trio time to call an ambulance, with Mrs Smith rushed to Toowoomba Hospital to be treated for a collapsed lung, broken ribs and other internal injuries.

Mr Smith said the roo, who left him ‘fearing for my life at one stage’, came at his head first before delivering strong powerful blows to his stomach and leg.

Despite the traumatic and painful ordeal, Mrs Smith said she wished no harm on the animal and hoped it would be left alone by authorities.

Mr Smith (pictured) said the roo, who left him 'fearing for my life at one stage', came at his head first before delivering strong powerful blows to his stomach and leg

Mr Smith (pictured) said the roo, who left him 'fearing for my life at one stage', came at his head first before delivering strong powerful blows to his stomach and leg

Mr Smith (pictured) said the roo, who left him ‘fearing for my life at one stage’, came at his head first before delivering strong powerful blows to his stomach and leg

‘When you’re a carer you learn the dangers of all the other kangaroos and you’re always aware they are wild animals. I am always careful, especially of the males. It’s breeding time so they can be more aggressive. I don’t want this kangaroo to be hunted down and killed, I love animals.’

While she can understand what happened and why, she said the kangaroo was the most aggressive one she had ever encountered.

Mrs Smith, who only recently recovered from pneumonia, was due to undergo surgery at Toowoomba Hospital Sunday afternoon.

Her family has been taking care of wild kangaroos, particularly during drought conditions, for 15 years on their 60 acre property on Ayers Rock Rd in Cypress Gardens.

Mr Smith, 66, and his son, 40,  suffered superficial injuries including cuts to the face and were taken to Millmerran Hospital.

Mr Smith (leg pictured), 66, and his son, 40, suffered superficial injuries including cuts to the face and were taken to Millmerran Hospital

Mr Smith (leg pictured), 66, and his son, 40, suffered superficial injuries including cuts to the face and were taken to Millmerran Hospital

Mr Smith (leg pictured), 66, and his son, 40, suffered superficial injuries including cuts to the face and were taken to Millmerran Hospital

While Mrs Smith can understand what happened and why, she said the kangaroo was the most aggressive one she had ever encountered (stock image)

While Mrs Smith can understand what happened and why, she said the kangaroo was the most aggressive one she had ever encountered (stock image)

While Mrs Smith can understand what happened and why, she said the kangaroo was the most aggressive one she had ever encountered (stock image)

Wildlife expert Ian Tembly previously told The Age , kangaroo attacks are rare, but when they do happen, they can be fatal in some circumstances.

‘If you’re standing up, the kangaroo can kick you with its hind feet and that can pretty much rip you open. That’s extremely dangerous,’ Mr Tembly said.

He said the best way to avoid being attacked by a kangaroo is to always keep a safe distance, never give them food, and to always watch for signs of aggression.

The most common warning signs of aggression in kangaroos include standing on their toes, scratching their stomach or growling.

Mr Tembly said if a kangaroo does attack, never stand tall and face the animal because it could be misinterpreted as a challenge to fight.

‘You need to crouch down low and back away, get away, and get a bush or a tree between you and the kangaroo. It’s not going to chase you far,’ he said.

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