Yassmin Abdel-Magied disrespects ANZAC Day AGAIN

Controversial Muslim activist Yassmin Abdel-Magied has weighed in on Anzac Day again, this time with an extraordinary rant about online trolls and white privilege.

Ms Abdel-Magied left Australia in 2017 after being heavily criticised over an April 25 tweet where she used the phrase ‘lest we forget’ to make a political point.  

On Wednesday morning she took to social media once again to make the country’s most sacred day all about her, saying she ‘used to really like Anzac Day’.

Her tirade began with her saying she had been tagged in a series of tweets about online Twitter abuse becoming ‘worse than ever before’ for journalists.

”Huh”, is my response, mostly cos I’m still waking up. I check the date – it’s almost ANZAC Day,’ she wrote. 

Controversial Muslim youth activist Yassmin Abdel-Magied (pictured)

Controversial Muslim youth activist Yassmin Abdel-Magied (pictured)

Controversial Muslim youth activist Yassmin Abdel-Magied (pictured)

‘I am not quite sure of the appropriate way to process these bits of information,’ she said before launching her confused diatribe.

In the rant over dozens of Tweets, Ms Abdel-Magied, 28, said social media abuse was worse for black people.  

‘Yes, online abuse on Twitter is a sh*tshow,’ she wrote.

‘But if you’re a white middle class man, you’re probably getting the easier end of it.

‘If you’re a BIPOC (black, indigenous, person of colour) in Australia, you’ve been accustomed to it.’

‘If you’re white in Australia, you’ve had a (relatively) comfortable time in the public eye. That’s not to say it’s been objectively fine, but in comparison to your BIPOC (and Muslim) colleagues, it’s a walk in the park.’

Ms Abdel-Magied went on to discuss how best to deal with internet trolls and claimed that technology is racist.

She wrote: ‘Read algorithms of oppression or any other book about how technology is biased (or wait for my book on it!)’ 

In the rant over dozens of Tweets, Ms Abdel-Magied said social media abuse was worse for black people

In the rant over dozens of Tweets, Ms Abdel-Magied said social media abuse was worse for black people

 In the rant over dozens of Tweets, Ms Abdel-Magied said social media abuse was worse for black people

In another tweet she wrote: ‘I used to really like Anzac Day, you know? I’d go to a march, think about the banality of evil, smile and nod at veterans, have a cry’

‘Now, I don’t really know what to do. Well, I guess I’ll still have a cry, hay? [sic]’

Ms Abdel-Magied, who was born in Sudan and grew up in Brisbane, provoked outrage in April 2017 when she used Anzac Day to make a political statement.

‘Lest. We. Forget. (Manus, Nauru, Syria, Palestine),’ she wrote on Twitter before she later deleted her tweet and apologised unreservedly.

Towards the end of 2017, she likened the criticism she faced in Australia to ‘dating an abusive guy’.

Despite coming under fire from politicians and being raked over the coals in the media, Ms Abdel-Magied won a free speech prize for the controversial tweet.

Liberty Victoria awarded her their Young Voltaire Award for 2018, saying she deserved recognition for weathering criticism from ‘internet trolls, tabloid newspapers and even numerous members of parliament’. 

Ms Abdel-Magied, who was born in Sudan and grew up in Brisbane, provoked outrage in April 2017 when she used Anzac Day to make a political statement

Ms Abdel-Magied, who was born in Sudan and grew up in Brisbane, provoked outrage in April 2017 when she used Anzac Day to make a political statement

Ms Abdel-Magied, who was born in Sudan and grew up in Brisbane, provoked outrage in April 2017 when she used Anzac Day to make a political statement

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